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Title: Assessing microbial residues in soil as a potential carbon sink and moderator of carbon use efficiency

Abstract

Abstract A longstanding assumption of glucose tracing experiments is that all glucose is microbially utilized during short incubations of ≤2 days to become microbial biomass or carbon dioxide. Carbon use efficiency (CUE) estimates have consequently ignored the formation of residues (non-living microbial products) although such materials could represent an important sink of glucose that is prone to stabilization as soil organic matter. We examined the dynamics of microbial residue formation from a short tracer experiment with frequent samplings over 72 h, and conducted a meta-analysis of previously published glucose tracing studies to assess the generality of these experimental results. Both our experiment and meta-analysis indicated 30–34% of amended glucose-C ( 13 C or 14 C) was in the form of residues within the first 6 h of substrate addition. We expand the conventional efficiency calculation to include residues in both the numerator and denominator of efficiency, thereby deriving a novel metric of the potential persistence of glucose-C in soil as living microbial biomass plus residues (‘carbon stabilization efficiency’). This new metric indicates nearly 40% of amended glucose-C persists in soil 180 days after amendment, the majority as non-biomass residues. Starting microbial biomass and clay content emerge as critical factors that positively promote such longmore » term stabilization of labile C. Rapid residue production supports the conclusion that non-growth maintenance activity can illicit high demands for C in soil, perhaps equaling that directed towards growth, and that residues may have an underestimated role in the cycling and sequestration potential of C in soil.« less


Citation Formats

Geyer, Kevin, Schnecker, Jörg, Grandy, A. Stuart, Richter, Andreas, and Frey, Serita. Assessing microbial residues in soil as a potential carbon sink and moderator of carbon use efficiency. Netherlands: N. p., 2020. Web. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-020-00720-4.
Geyer, Kevin, Schnecker, Jörg, Grandy, A. Stuart, Richter, Andreas, & Frey, Serita. Assessing microbial residues in soil as a potential carbon sink and moderator of carbon use efficiency. Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-020-00720-4
Geyer, Kevin, Schnecker, Jörg, Grandy, A. Stuart, Richter, Andreas, and Frey, Serita. Tue . "Assessing microbial residues in soil as a potential carbon sink and moderator of carbon use efficiency". Netherlands. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10533-020-00720-4.
@article{osti_1716539,
title = {Assessing microbial residues in soil as a potential carbon sink and moderator of carbon use efficiency},
author = {Geyer, Kevin and Schnecker, Jörg and Grandy, A. Stuart and Richter, Andreas and Frey, Serita},
abstractNote = {Abstract A longstanding assumption of glucose tracing experiments is that all glucose is microbially utilized during short incubations of ≤2 days to become microbial biomass or carbon dioxide. Carbon use efficiency (CUE) estimates have consequently ignored the formation of residues (non-living microbial products) although such materials could represent an important sink of glucose that is prone to stabilization as soil organic matter. We examined the dynamics of microbial residue formation from a short tracer experiment with frequent samplings over 72 h, and conducted a meta-analysis of previously published glucose tracing studies to assess the generality of these experimental results. Both our experiment and meta-analysis indicated 30–34% of amended glucose-C ( 13 C or 14 C) was in the form of residues within the first 6 h of substrate addition. We expand the conventional efficiency calculation to include residues in both the numerator and denominator of efficiency, thereby deriving a novel metric of the potential persistence of glucose-C in soil as living microbial biomass plus residues (‘carbon stabilization efficiency’). This new metric indicates nearly 40% of amended glucose-C persists in soil 180 days after amendment, the majority as non-biomass residues. Starting microbial biomass and clay content emerge as critical factors that positively promote such long term stabilization of labile C. Rapid residue production supports the conclusion that non-growth maintenance activity can illicit high demands for C in soil, perhaps equaling that directed towards growth, and that residues may have an underestimated role in the cycling and sequestration potential of C in soil.},
doi = {10.1007/s10533-020-00720-4},
journal = {Biogeochemistry},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {2020},
month = {11}
}

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