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Title: Laboratory Validation of Integrated Lighting Systems Retrofit Performance and Energy Savings

Abstract

Light-emitting diodes (LED) fixtures and lamps have emerged as leading technologies for general illumination and are a well-established energy efficiency retrofit measure in commercial buildings (from around 2% of installed fixtures and lamps in 2013 to 28% by 2020). Retrofit approaches that integrate elements, such as networked controls, daylight dimming, and advanced shade technologies lag in comparison. Integrated retrofits have been shown to increase savings over single end-use retrofits, but are perceived as higher complexity and risk. More validation of integrated lighting system performance is needed. This study presents results from laboratory testing of three packages combining fixtures, networked controls, task tuning, and daylight dimming, advanced shades, and lighting layout changes. We characterize performance in perimeter open-office zones, finding energy savings from 20% for daylight dimming and automated shades (no LED retrofit) to over 70% for LED retrofits with advanced controls and shades or lighting layout changes. We present some implementation details, including lessons learned from installation and commissioning in the laboratory setting. We also discuss cost-benefit analysis approaches for the types of packages presented, including the need to quantify and incorporate energy and non-energy benefits for advanced shades packages, which enhance occupant comfort but add significant cost.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Energy Efficiency Office. Building Technologies Office; California Energy Commission
OSTI Identifier:
1685052
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; GFO-16-304
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Energies (Basel)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Energies (Basel); Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 13; Journal ID: ISSN 1996-1073
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; integrated lighting retrofits; advanced lighting controls; daylighting; LEDs; commercial buildings; energy savings; automated shading systems

Citation Formats

Shackelford, Jordan, Mathew, Paul, Regnier, Cynthia, and Walter, Travis. Laboratory Validation of Integrated Lighting Systems Retrofit Performance and Energy Savings. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13133329.
Shackelford, Jordan, Mathew, Paul, Regnier, Cynthia, & Walter, Travis. Laboratory Validation of Integrated Lighting Systems Retrofit Performance and Energy Savings. United States. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13133329
Shackelford, Jordan, Mathew, Paul, Regnier, Cynthia, and Walter, Travis. Tue . "Laboratory Validation of Integrated Lighting Systems Retrofit Performance and Energy Savings". United States. https://doi.org/10.3390/en13133329. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1685052.
@article{osti_1685052,
title = {Laboratory Validation of Integrated Lighting Systems Retrofit Performance and Energy Savings},
author = {Shackelford, Jordan and Mathew, Paul and Regnier, Cynthia and Walter, Travis},
abstractNote = {Light-emitting diodes (LED) fixtures and lamps have emerged as leading technologies for general illumination and are a well-established energy efficiency retrofit measure in commercial buildings (from around 2% of installed fixtures and lamps in 2013 to 28% by 2020). Retrofit approaches that integrate elements, such as networked controls, daylight dimming, and advanced shade technologies lag in comparison. Integrated retrofits have been shown to increase savings over single end-use retrofits, but are perceived as higher complexity and risk. More validation of integrated lighting system performance is needed. This study presents results from laboratory testing of three packages combining fixtures, networked controls, task tuning, and daylight dimming, advanced shades, and lighting layout changes. We characterize performance in perimeter open-office zones, finding energy savings from 20% for daylight dimming and automated shades (no LED retrofit) to over 70% for LED retrofits with advanced controls and shades or lighting layout changes. We present some implementation details, including lessons learned from installation and commissioning in the laboratory setting. We also discuss cost-benefit analysis approaches for the types of packages presented, including the need to quantify and incorporate energy and non-energy benefits for advanced shades packages, which enhance occupant comfort but add significant cost.},
doi = {10.3390/en13133329},
journal = {Energies (Basel)},
number = 13,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {6}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Figures / Tables:

Table 1 Table 1: System descriptions and attributes

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Works referenced in this record:

Manually-operated window shade patterns in office buildings: A critical review
journal, February 2013


Evaluation methods and development of a new glare prediction model for daylight environments with the use of CCD cameras
journal, July 2006


Quantifying the benefits of a building retrofit using an integrated system approach: A case study
journal, January 2018


Dynamic Daylight Performance Metrics for Sustainable Building Design
journal, July 2006


Useful daylight illuminance: a new paradigm for assessing daylight in buildings
journal, March 2005


A review of methods to match building energy simulation models to measured data
journal, September 2014