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Title: Vertical effective stress as a control on quartz cementation in sandstones

Abstract

Temperature-controlled precipitation kinetics has become the overwhelmingly dominant hypothesis for the control of quartz cementation in sandstones. Here, we integrate quantitative petrographic data, high spatial resolution oxygen isotope analyses of quartz cement, basin modelling and a kinetic model for quartz precipitation to suggest that the supply of silica from stress-sensitive intergranular pressure dissolution at grain contacts is in fact a key control on quartz cementation in sandstones. We present data from highly overpressured sandstones in which, despite the current burial temperature of 190 °C, quartz cement occurs in low amounts (4.6 ± 1.2% of bulk volume). In situ oxygen isotope data across quartz overgrowths suggest that cementation occurred over 100 Ma and a temperature range of 80-150 °C, during which time high fluid overpressures resulted in consistently low vertical effective stress. In conclusion, we argue that the very low amounts of quartz cement can only be explained by the low vertical effective stress which occurred throughout the burial history and which restricted silica supply as a result of a low rate of intergranular pressure dissolution at grain contacts.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Durham University (United Kingdom)
  2. University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division
OSTI Identifier:
1668748
Grant/Contract Number:  
FG02-93ER14389
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Marine and Petroleum Geology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 98; Journal ID: ISSN 0264-8172
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Sandstone; Diagenesis; Quartz cement; Effective stress; Secondary ion mass spectrometry; Oxygen isotopes

Citation Formats

Oye, Olakunle J., Aplin, Andrew C., Jones, Stuart J., Gluyas, Jon G., Bowen, Leon, Orland, Ian J., and Valley, John W. Vertical effective stress as a control on quartz cementation in sandstones. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2018.09.017.
Oye, Olakunle J., Aplin, Andrew C., Jones, Stuart J., Gluyas, Jon G., Bowen, Leon, Orland, Ian J., & Valley, John W. Vertical effective stress as a control on quartz cementation in sandstones. United States. doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2018.09.017.
Oye, Olakunle J., Aplin, Andrew C., Jones, Stuart J., Gluyas, Jon G., Bowen, Leon, Orland, Ian J., and Valley, John W. Mon . "Vertical effective stress as a control on quartz cementation in sandstones". United States. doi:10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2018.09.017. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1668748.
@article{osti_1668748,
title = {Vertical effective stress as a control on quartz cementation in sandstones},
author = {Oye, Olakunle J. and Aplin, Andrew C. and Jones, Stuart J. and Gluyas, Jon G. and Bowen, Leon and Orland, Ian J. and Valley, John W.},
abstractNote = {Temperature-controlled precipitation kinetics has become the overwhelmingly dominant hypothesis for the control of quartz cementation in sandstones. Here, we integrate quantitative petrographic data, high spatial resolution oxygen isotope analyses of quartz cement, basin modelling and a kinetic model for quartz precipitation to suggest that the supply of silica from stress-sensitive intergranular pressure dissolution at grain contacts is in fact a key control on quartz cementation in sandstones. We present data from highly overpressured sandstones in which, despite the current burial temperature of 190 °C, quartz cement occurs in low amounts (4.6 ± 1.2% of bulk volume). In situ oxygen isotope data across quartz overgrowths suggest that cementation occurred over 100 Ma and a temperature range of 80-150 °C, during which time high fluid overpressures resulted in consistently low vertical effective stress. In conclusion, we argue that the very low amounts of quartz cement can only be explained by the low vertical effective stress which occurred throughout the burial history and which restricted silica supply as a result of a low rate of intergranular pressure dissolution at grain contacts.},
doi = {10.1016/j.marpetgeo.2018.09.017},
journal = {Marine and Petroleum Geology},
number = ,
volume = 98,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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