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Title: Development of high efficiency window air conditioner using propane under limited charge

Abstract

The residential air conditioner market has a significant portion of window air conditioners (WAC). Due to the compact size and small refrigerant charge, WACs are most tolerant of flammable refrigerants. Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants are natural substances and have significantly better environmental impacts and lower costs than conventional refrigerants like R-410A and R-22. The paper aimed to develop a WAC prototype using propane (R-290) and verify the performance metrics in the laboratory. The key of developing the WAC using a flammable refrigerant is to control the refrigerant charge under the limit of building safety regulation with the performance meeting the Energy Star standard. To minimize the charge, compact heat exchangers were utilized. To achieve the target efficiency, we collaborated with a leading rotary compressor manufacturer to develop a compressor prototype specifically optimized for R-290, able to achieve superior energy efficiency. In addition, we conducted model-based investigations to identify further charge reduction potential. Finally, with using microchannel heat exchangers to replace the fin-and-tube condenser and evaporator, the system charge can be decreased to 150 g.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Building Technologies Research and Integration Center
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1649540
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1780251
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied Thermal Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 166; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1359-4311
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; Propane; Window air conditioner; Refrigerant charge reduction; Compact heat exchangers

Citation Formats

Shen, Bo, and Fricke, Brian. Development of high efficiency window air conditioner using propane under limited charge. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2019.114662.
Shen, Bo, & Fricke, Brian. Development of high efficiency window air conditioner using propane under limited charge. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2019.114662
Shen, Bo, and Fricke, Brian. Sat . "Development of high efficiency window air conditioner using propane under limited charge". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2019.114662. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1649540.
@article{osti_1649540,
title = {Development of high efficiency window air conditioner using propane under limited charge},
author = {Shen, Bo and Fricke, Brian},
abstractNote = {The residential air conditioner market has a significant portion of window air conditioners (WAC). Due to the compact size and small refrigerant charge, WACs are most tolerant of flammable refrigerants. Hydrocarbon (HC) refrigerants are natural substances and have significantly better environmental impacts and lower costs than conventional refrigerants like R-410A and R-22. The paper aimed to develop a WAC prototype using propane (R-290) and verify the performance metrics in the laboratory. The key of developing the WAC using a flammable refrigerant is to control the refrigerant charge under the limit of building safety regulation with the performance meeting the Energy Star standard. To minimize the charge, compact heat exchangers were utilized. To achieve the target efficiency, we collaborated with a leading rotary compressor manufacturer to develop a compressor prototype specifically optimized for R-290, able to achieve superior energy efficiency. In addition, we conducted model-based investigations to identify further charge reduction potential. Finally, with using microchannel heat exchangers to replace the fin-and-tube condenser and evaporator, the system charge can be decreased to 150 g.},
doi = {10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2019.114662},
journal = {Applied Thermal Engineering},
number = 1,
volume = 166,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
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