skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Fall Prevention in Community Settings: Results from Implementing Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance in Three States

Abstract

Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance (TCMBB) is an evidence-based fall prevention exercise program being disseminated in selected communities through state injury prevention programs. This study: (1) describes the personal characteristics of TCMBB participants; (2) quantifies participants’ functional and self-reported health status at enrollment; and (3) measures changes in participants’ functional and self-reported health status post-intervention. There were 421 participants enrolled in 36 TCMBB programs delivered in Colorado, New York, and Oregon. Of the 209 participants who completed both baseline enrollment and post-intervention surveys, the average age of participants was 75.3 (SD ± 8.2) years. Most participants were female (81.3%), non-Hispanic (96.1%), White (94.1%), and described themselves as in excellent or very good health (52.2%). Paired t-test and general estimating equation models assessed changes over the 3-month program period. Pre- and post-assessment self-reported surveys and objective functional data [Timed Up and Go (TUG) test] were collected. On average, TUG test scores decreased (p < 0.001) for all participants; however, the decrease was most noticeable among high-risk participants (mean decreased from 18.5 to 15.7 s). The adjusted odds ratio of reporting feeling confident that a participant could keep themselves from falling was five times greater after completing the program. TCMBB, whichmore » addresses gait and balance problems, can be an effective way to reduce falls among the older adult population. By helping older adults maintain their functional abilities, TCMBB can help community-dwelling older adults continue to live independently.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [3];  [3];  [3]
  1. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Health Science Center. School of Public Health. Dept. of Health Promotion and Community Health Sciences
  2. Univ. of Georgia, Athens, GA (United States). College of Public Health. Dept. of Health Promotion and Behavior
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, GA (United States). National Center for Injury Prevention and Control
  4. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Health Science Center. School of Public Health. Dept. of Epidemiology and Biostatistics
  5. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Statistics
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1630048
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0014664
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Public Health
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2296-2565
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance; fall prevention; fall prevention program; community setting; older adults

Citation Formats

Ory, Marcia G., Smith, Matthew Lee, Parker, Erin M., Jiang, Luohua, Chen, Shuai, Wilson, Ashley D., Stevens, Judy A., Ehrenreich, Heidi, and Lee, Robin. Fall Prevention in Community Settings: Results from Implementing Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance in Three States. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2014.00258.
Ory, Marcia G., Smith, Matthew Lee, Parker, Erin M., Jiang, Luohua, Chen, Shuai, Wilson, Ashley D., Stevens, Judy A., Ehrenreich, Heidi, & Lee, Robin. Fall Prevention in Community Settings: Results from Implementing Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance in Three States. United States. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2014.00258
Ory, Marcia G., Smith, Matthew Lee, Parker, Erin M., Jiang, Luohua, Chen, Shuai, Wilson, Ashley D., Stevens, Judy A., Ehrenreich, Heidi, and Lee, Robin. Mon . "Fall Prevention in Community Settings: Results from Implementing Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance in Three States". United States. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpubh.2014.00258. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1630048.
@article{osti_1630048,
title = {Fall Prevention in Community Settings: Results from Implementing Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance in Three States},
author = {Ory, Marcia G. and Smith, Matthew Lee and Parker, Erin M. and Jiang, Luohua and Chen, Shuai and Wilson, Ashley D. and Stevens, Judy A. and Ehrenreich, Heidi and Lee, Robin},
abstractNote = {Tai Chi: Moving for Better Balance (TCMBB) is an evidence-based fall prevention exercise program being disseminated in selected communities through state injury prevention programs. This study: (1) describes the personal characteristics of TCMBB participants; (2) quantifies participants’ functional and self-reported health status at enrollment; and (3) measures changes in participants’ functional and self-reported health status post-intervention. There were 421 participants enrolled in 36 TCMBB programs delivered in Colorado, New York, and Oregon. Of the 209 participants who completed both baseline enrollment and post-intervention surveys, the average age of participants was 75.3 (SD ± 8.2) years. Most participants were female (81.3%), non-Hispanic (96.1%), White (94.1%), and described themselves as in excellent or very good health (52.2%). Paired t-test and general estimating equation models assessed changes over the 3-month program period. Pre- and post-assessment self-reported surveys and objective functional data [Timed Up and Go (TUG) test] were collected. On average, TUG test scores decreased (p < 0.001) for all participants; however, the decrease was most noticeable among high-risk participants (mean decreased from 18.5 to 15.7 s). The adjusted odds ratio of reporting feeling confident that a participant could keep themselves from falling was five times greater after completing the program. TCMBB, which addresses gait and balance problems, can be an effective way to reduce falls among the older adult population. By helping older adults maintain their functional abilities, TCMBB can help community-dwelling older adults continue to live independently.},
doi = {10.3389/fpubh.2014.00258},
journal = {Frontiers in Public Health},
number = ,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share:

Works referencing / citing this record:

Recruiting and Engaging Older Men in Evidence-Based Health Promotion Programs: Perspectives on Barriers and Strategies
journal, January 2016

  • Anderson, Chelsie; Seff, Laura R.; Batra, Anamika
  • Journal of Aging Research, Vol. 2016
  • DOI: 10.1155/2016/8981435

Disseminating the Otago Exercise Program in the United States: Perceived and Actual Physical Performance Improvements From Participants
journal, October 2016

  • Shubert, Tiffany E.; Smith, Matthew Lee; Jiang, Luohua
  • Journal of Applied Gerontology, Vol. 37, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1177/0733464816675422