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Title: Magnetotactic bacteria from Pavilion Lake, British Columbia

Abstract

Pavilion Lake is a slightly alkaline, freshwater lake located in British Columbia, Canada (50°51’N, 121°44’W). It is known for unusual organosedimentary structures, called microbialites that are found along the lake basin. These deposits are complex associations of fossilized microbial communities and detrital- or chemical-sedimentary rocks. During the summer, a sediment sample was collected from near the lake’s shore, approximately 25–50 cm below the water surface. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from this sample using a simple magnetic enrichment protocol. The MTB isolated from Pavilion Lake belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria class as determined by nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA genes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the bacteria were spirillum-shaped and contained a single chain of cuboctahedral-shaped magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals that were approximately 40 nm in diameter. This discovery of MTB in Pavilion Lake offers an opportunity to better understand the diversity of MTB habitats, the geobiological function of MTB in unique freshwater ecosystems, and search for magnetofossils contained within the lake’s microbialites.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). College of Science and Engineering
  2. The Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States). School of Environment and Natural Resources. School of Earth Sciences
  3. Research and Testing Lab., Lubbock, TX (United States)
  4. Univ. of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). School of Life Sciences
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Ames Lab., Ames, IA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER). Biological Systems Science Division
OSTI Identifier:
1628101
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-07CH11358
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Frontiers in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1664-302X
Publisher:
Frontiers Research Foundation
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Microbiology; magnetotactic bacteria; microbialites; transmission electron microscope; magnetite nanoparticles; magnetite; magnetosomes

Citation Formats

Oestreicher, Zachery, Lower, Steven K., Rees, Eric, Bazylinski, Dennis A., and Lower, Brian H. Magnetotactic bacteria from Pavilion Lake, British Columbia. United States: N. p., 2013. Web. doi:10.3389/fmicb.2013.00406.
Oestreicher, Zachery, Lower, Steven K., Rees, Eric, Bazylinski, Dennis A., & Lower, Brian H. Magnetotactic bacteria from Pavilion Lake, British Columbia. United States. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2013.00406
Oestreicher, Zachery, Lower, Steven K., Rees, Eric, Bazylinski, Dennis A., and Lower, Brian H. Tue . "Magnetotactic bacteria from Pavilion Lake, British Columbia". United States. https://doi.org/10.3389/fmicb.2013.00406. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1628101.
@article{osti_1628101,
title = {Magnetotactic bacteria from Pavilion Lake, British Columbia},
author = {Oestreicher, Zachery and Lower, Steven K. and Rees, Eric and Bazylinski, Dennis A. and Lower, Brian H.},
abstractNote = {Pavilion Lake is a slightly alkaline, freshwater lake located in British Columbia, Canada (50°51’N, 121°44’W). It is known for unusual organosedimentary structures, called microbialites that are found along the lake basin. These deposits are complex associations of fossilized microbial communities and detrital- or chemical-sedimentary rocks. During the summer, a sediment sample was collected from near the lake’s shore, approximately 25–50 cm below the water surface. Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) were isolated from this sample using a simple magnetic enrichment protocol. The MTB isolated from Pavilion Lake belonged to the Alphaproteobacteria class as determined by nucleotide sequences of 16S rRNA genes. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that the bacteria were spirillum-shaped and contained a single chain of cuboctahedral-shaped magnetite (Fe3O4) crystals that were approximately 40 nm in diameter. This discovery of MTB in Pavilion Lake offers an opportunity to better understand the diversity of MTB habitats, the geobiological function of MTB in unique freshwater ecosystems, and search for magnetofossils contained within the lake’s microbialites.},
doi = {10.3389/fmicb.2013.00406},
journal = {Frontiers in Microbiology},
number = ,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2013},
month = {1}
}