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Title: An Eulerian multimaterial framework for simulating high-explosive aquarium tests

Abstract

Aquarium tests of cylindrical high-explosive charges provide optical data of the detonation front velocity and shape, propagation of the shock wave in the surrounding water, and expansion rates of the detonation products behind the front. Data from aquarium experiments is often used for calibration of reactive burn models based on phenomenological equations of state (EOS) and reaction rate laws. This paper presents a multimaterial numerical modeling framework to solve the 2D axisymmetric reactive Euler equations for high-explosive aquarium tests, in particular for ammonium nitrate - fuel oil (ANFO) explosives. An extension of the Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) is used to handle the dynamic material interfaces for the ANFO explosion products, the charge-confining material (polymethyl methacrylate PMMA), and the surrounding water. This study analyzes the sensitivity of calculations (both computational efficiency and numerical accuracy) to different algorithms for the material interface models including the original GFM versus Riemann solver-based strategies. A novel method for defining the left and right states in the interfacial Riemann problem eliminates the need for sorting or nodal interpolation during the projection along the material interface. Numerical tests indicate that populating the interface node values using the Riemann solution mitigate the overheating error observed in steady-state calculations.more » Solution convergence and computational efficiency are explored as a function of the spatial and temporal order of the schemes. Results from the computational model with analytical equations of state and fitted reaction rate parameters show very good quantitative agreement with experimentally observed detonation front velocity, reaction products expansion, and shock wave propagation in the surrounding water for a cylindrical ANFO charge encased in PMMA. Finally, the proposed modeling framework, in conjunction with experimental tests, provides a reliable tool to assess equations of state and reaction rate expressions for reactive burn models of confined high explosives.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
  2. Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1623433
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-20-22401
Journal ID: ISSN 0045-7930
Grant/Contract Number:  
89233218CNA000001
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Computers and Fluids
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 205; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0045-7930
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; detonation; reactive burn; shock capturing; Ghost Fluid Method

Citation Formats

Lozano Sanchez, Jose Eduardo, Jackson, Gregory S, and Petr, Vilem. An Eulerian multimaterial framework for simulating high-explosive aquarium tests. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1016/j.compfluid.2020.104524.
Lozano Sanchez, Jose Eduardo, Jackson, Gregory S, & Petr, Vilem. An Eulerian multimaterial framework for simulating high-explosive aquarium tests. United States. doi:10.1016/j.compfluid.2020.104524.
Lozano Sanchez, Jose Eduardo, Jackson, Gregory S, and Petr, Vilem. Tue . "An Eulerian multimaterial framework for simulating high-explosive aquarium tests". United States. doi:10.1016/j.compfluid.2020.104524.
@article{osti_1623433,
title = {An Eulerian multimaterial framework for simulating high-explosive aquarium tests},
author = {Lozano Sanchez, Jose Eduardo and Jackson, Gregory S and Petr, Vilem},
abstractNote = {Aquarium tests of cylindrical high-explosive charges provide optical data of the detonation front velocity and shape, propagation of the shock wave in the surrounding water, and expansion rates of the detonation products behind the front. Data from aquarium experiments is often used for calibration of reactive burn models based on phenomenological equations of state (EOS) and reaction rate laws. This paper presents a multimaterial numerical modeling framework to solve the 2D axisymmetric reactive Euler equations for high-explosive aquarium tests, in particular for ammonium nitrate - fuel oil (ANFO) explosives. An extension of the Ghost Fluid Method (GFM) is used to handle the dynamic material interfaces for the ANFO explosion products, the charge-confining material (polymethyl methacrylate PMMA), and the surrounding water. This study analyzes the sensitivity of calculations (both computational efficiency and numerical accuracy) to different algorithms for the material interface models including the original GFM versus Riemann solver-based strategies. A novel method for defining the left and right states in the interfacial Riemann problem eliminates the need for sorting or nodal interpolation during the projection along the material interface. Numerical tests indicate that populating the interface node values using the Riemann solution mitigate the overheating error observed in steady-state calculations. Solution convergence and computational efficiency are explored as a function of the spatial and temporal order of the schemes. Results from the computational model with analytical equations of state and fitted reaction rate parameters show very good quantitative agreement with experimentally observed detonation front velocity, reaction products expansion, and shock wave propagation in the surrounding water for a cylindrical ANFO charge encased in PMMA. Finally, the proposed modeling framework, in conjunction with experimental tests, provides a reliable tool to assess equations of state and reaction rate expressions for reactive burn models of confined high explosives.},
doi = {10.1016/j.compfluid.2020.104524},
journal = {Computers and Fluids},
number = C,
volume = 205,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {5}
}

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