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Title: Fungi in the Canopy: How Soil Fungi and Extracellular Enzymes Differ Between Canopy and Ground Soils

Abstract

Abstract Tropical montane cloud forests contain a large abundance and diversity of canopy epiphytes, which depend on canopy soil to retain water and nutrients. We lack an in depth understanding of how these soils contribute to ecosystem processes and soil diversity and how sensitive they may be to projected climate change. We compared canopy and ground soils in Monteverde, Costa Rica, to determine how these two soil types differ in their extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) and fungal communities. Samples were also collected along two elevation gradients to reveal if canopy soils differed in how EEA and fungal communities responded to elevation compared to ground soils. We found that canopy soils had higher EEA than ground soils. Fungal communities were less diverse and differed significantly between the two soil types. These differences were associated with higher relative abundances of yeasts and endophytes in canopy soils. The relative abundances of free-living filamentous fungi and yeasts shifted more dramatically with elevation in canopy soils compared to ground soils. Our study suggests that canopy soils may be a reservoir for endophytes. Epiphytes may invest in symbionts that promote stress tolerance over mycorrhizal fungi whose high resource demands are costly and less beneficial. Overall, soilsmore » harbor distinct fungal communities that may be altered under projected climate change.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1619440
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0016410
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecosystems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Ecosystems Journal Volume: 23 Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1432-9840
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Looby, Caitlin I., Hollenbeck, Emily C., and Treseder, Kathleen K. Fungi in the Canopy: How Soil Fungi and Extracellular Enzymes Differ Between Canopy and Ground Soils. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-019-00439-w.
Looby, Caitlin I., Hollenbeck, Emily C., & Treseder, Kathleen K. Fungi in the Canopy: How Soil Fungi and Extracellular Enzymes Differ Between Canopy and Ground Soils. United States. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-019-00439-w
Looby, Caitlin I., Hollenbeck, Emily C., and Treseder, Kathleen K. Mon . "Fungi in the Canopy: How Soil Fungi and Extracellular Enzymes Differ Between Canopy and Ground Soils". United States. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-019-00439-w.
@article{osti_1619440,
title = {Fungi in the Canopy: How Soil Fungi and Extracellular Enzymes Differ Between Canopy and Ground Soils},
author = {Looby, Caitlin I. and Hollenbeck, Emily C. and Treseder, Kathleen K.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Tropical montane cloud forests contain a large abundance and diversity of canopy epiphytes, which depend on canopy soil to retain water and nutrients. We lack an in depth understanding of how these soils contribute to ecosystem processes and soil diversity and how sensitive they may be to projected climate change. We compared canopy and ground soils in Monteverde, Costa Rica, to determine how these two soil types differ in their extracellular enzyme activity (EEA) and fungal communities. Samples were also collected along two elevation gradients to reveal if canopy soils differed in how EEA and fungal communities responded to elevation compared to ground soils. We found that canopy soils had higher EEA than ground soils. Fungal communities were less diverse and differed significantly between the two soil types. These differences were associated with higher relative abundances of yeasts and endophytes in canopy soils. The relative abundances of free-living filamentous fungi and yeasts shifted more dramatically with elevation in canopy soils compared to ground soils. Our study suggests that canopy soils may be a reservoir for endophytes. Epiphytes may invest in symbionts that promote stress tolerance over mycorrhizal fungi whose high resource demands are costly and less beneficial. Overall, soils harbor distinct fungal communities that may be altered under projected climate change.},
doi = {10.1007/s10021-019-00439-w},
journal = {Ecosystems},
number = 4,
volume = 23,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
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Publisher's Version of Record
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10021-019-00439-w

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