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Title: Performance of low-cost indoor air quality monitors for PM2.5 and PM10 from residential sources

Abstract

Advances in particle sensor design and manufacturing have enabled the development of low-cost air quality monitors (LCMs). Here, the sensors use light scattering to estimate mass concentration and thus require evaluation for aerosols of varied composition and size distribution. We tested the performance of six LCMs designed for home use and having a retail price under US$300 in October 2018. We assessed their performance by comparing their output to reference PM2.5 and PM10 measurements from 21 common residential sources and from infiltrated outdoor PM2.5. Reference data were obtained by using gravimetric measurements to adjust time-resolved output from an aerosol spectrometer with both electrical mobility and optical particle sensors. Compared by linear regression to reference measurements, LCMs had negative intercepts and slopes of 1–2 for infiltrated outdoor PM2.5. Semi-quantitative responses (~50–200% of actual PM2.5) were obtained for varied aerosols including minerals (ultrasonic humidifier, vacuuming, test dust); combustion products (incense, mosquito coil, extinguished candles); microwave popcorn; and cooking involving frying or grilling. LCMs had low or no response to sources for which all mass was in particles smaller than 0.25 μm, including steady candle flames and cooking without frying or grilling. PM10 data from LCMs was more variable than PM2.5.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Tianjin Univ. (China)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Key Project of the Ministry of Science and Technology, China
OSTI Identifier:
1619168
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1595159
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; 2016YFC0207101; DW-89-9232201-7
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Building and Environment
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 171; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0360-1323
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
combustion; consumer IAQ monitor; cooking; exposure; intervention; source control

Citation Formats

Wang, Zhiqiang, Delp, William W., and Singer, Brett C. Performance of low-cost indoor air quality monitors for PM2.5 and PM10 from residential sources. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.106654.
Wang, Zhiqiang, Delp, William W., & Singer, Brett C. Performance of low-cost indoor air quality monitors for PM2.5 and PM10 from residential sources. United States. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.106654.
Wang, Zhiqiang, Delp, William W., and Singer, Brett C. Mon . "Performance of low-cost indoor air quality monitors for PM2.5 and PM10 from residential sources". United States. doi:10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.106654.
@article{osti_1619168,
title = {Performance of low-cost indoor air quality monitors for PM2.5 and PM10 from residential sources},
author = {Wang, Zhiqiang and Delp, William W. and Singer, Brett C.},
abstractNote = {Advances in particle sensor design and manufacturing have enabled the development of low-cost air quality monitors (LCMs). Here, the sensors use light scattering to estimate mass concentration and thus require evaluation for aerosols of varied composition and size distribution. We tested the performance of six LCMs designed for home use and having a retail price under US$300 in October 2018. We assessed their performance by comparing their output to reference PM2.5 and PM10 measurements from 21 common residential sources and from infiltrated outdoor PM2.5. Reference data were obtained by using gravimetric measurements to adjust time-resolved output from an aerosol spectrometer with both electrical mobility and optical particle sensors. Compared by linear regression to reference measurements, LCMs had negative intercepts and slopes of 1–2 for infiltrated outdoor PM2.5. Semi-quantitative responses (~50–200% of actual PM2.5) were obtained for varied aerosols including minerals (ultrasonic humidifier, vacuuming, test dust); combustion products (incense, mosquito coil, extinguished candles); microwave popcorn; and cooking involving frying or grilling. LCMs had low or no response to sources for which all mass was in particles smaller than 0.25 μm, including steady candle flames and cooking without frying or grilling. PM10 data from LCMs was more variable than PM2.5.},
doi = {10.1016/j.buildenv.2020.106654},
journal = {Building and Environment},
number = C,
volume = 171,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on January 20, 2021
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