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Title: Techno-economic analysis of the deacetylation and disk refining process: characterizing the effect of refining energy and enzyme usage on minimum sugar selling price and minimum ethanol selling price

Abstract

A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibility of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refiningmore » energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Transportation Office. Bioenergy Technologies Office
OSTI Identifier:
1618623
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1227197
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-62721
Journal ID: ISSN 1754-6834; 173; PII: 358
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Biotechnology for Biofuels
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Biotechnology for Biofuels Journal Volume: 8 Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 1754-6834
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Country of Publication:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; biofuels; pretreatment; enzymatic hydrolysis; deacetylation; mechanical refining; disk refining; no acid pretreatment; clean sugar production

Citation Formats

Chen, Xiaowen, Shekiro, Joseph, Pschorn, Thomas, Sabourin, Marc, Tucker, Melvin P., and Tao, Ling. Techno-economic analysis of the deacetylation and disk refining process: characterizing the effect of refining energy and enzyme usage on minimum sugar selling price and minimum ethanol selling price. Netherlands: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1186/s13068-015-0358-0.
Chen, Xiaowen, Shekiro, Joseph, Pschorn, Thomas, Sabourin, Marc, Tucker, Melvin P., & Tao, Ling. Techno-economic analysis of the deacetylation and disk refining process: characterizing the effect of refining energy and enzyme usage on minimum sugar selling price and minimum ethanol selling price. Netherlands. doi:10.1186/s13068-015-0358-0.
Chen, Xiaowen, Shekiro, Joseph, Pschorn, Thomas, Sabourin, Marc, Tucker, Melvin P., and Tao, Ling. Thu . "Techno-economic analysis of the deacetylation and disk refining process: characterizing the effect of refining energy and enzyme usage on minimum sugar selling price and minimum ethanol selling price". Netherlands. doi:10.1186/s13068-015-0358-0.
@article{osti_1618623,
title = {Techno-economic analysis of the deacetylation and disk refining process: characterizing the effect of refining energy and enzyme usage on minimum sugar selling price and minimum ethanol selling price},
author = {Chen, Xiaowen and Shekiro, Joseph and Pschorn, Thomas and Sabourin, Marc and Tucker, Melvin P. and Tao, Ling},
abstractNote = {A novel, highly efficient deacetylation and disk refining (DDR) process to liberate fermentable sugars from biomass was recently developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The DDR process consists of a mild, dilute alkaline deacetylation step followed by low-energy-consumption disk refining. The DDR corn stover substrates achieved high process sugar conversion yields, at low to modest enzyme loadings, and also produced high sugar concentration syrups at high initial insoluble solid loadings. The sugar syrups derived from corn stover are highly fermentable due to low concentrations of fermentation inhibitors. The objective of this work is to evaluate the economic feasibility of the DDR process through a techno-economic analysis (TEA). A large array of experiments designed using a response surface methodology was carried out to investigate the two major cost-driven operational parameters of the novel DDR process: refining energy and enzyme loadings. The boundary conditions for refining energy (128–468 kWh/ODMT), cellulase (Novozyme’s CTec3) loading (11.6–28.4 mg total protein/g of cellulose), and hemicellulase (Novozyme’s HTec3) loading (0–5 mg total protein/g of cellulose) were chosen to cover the most commercially practical operating conditions. The sugar and ethanol yields were modeled with good adequacy, showing a positive linear correlation between those yields and refining energy and enzyme loadings. The ethanol yields ranged from 77 to 89 gallons/ODMT of corn stover. The minimum sugar selling price (MSSP) ranged from $0.191 to $0.212 per lb of 50 % concentrated monomeric sugars, while the minimum ethanol selling price (MESP) ranged from $2.24 to $2.54 per gallon of ethanol. The DDR process concept is evaluated for economic feasibility through TEA. The MSSP and MESP of the DDR process falls within a range similar to that found with the deacetylation/dilute acid pretreatment process modeled in NREL’s 2011 design report. The DDR process is a much simpler process that requires less capital and maintenance costs when compared to conventional chemical pretreatments with pressure vessels. As a result, we feel the DDR process should be considered as an option for future biorefineries with great potential to be more cost-effective.},
doi = {10.1186/s13068-015-0358-0},
journal = {Biotechnology for Biofuels},
number = 1,
volume = 8,
place = {Netherlands},
year = {2015},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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DOI: 10.1186/s13068-015-0358-0

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Cited by: 7 works
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    Dry biorefining maximizes the potentials of simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation for cellulosic ethanol production
    journal, October 2017

    • Liu, Gang; Zhang, Qiang; Li, Hongxing
    • Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Vol. 115, Issue 1
    • DOI: 10.1002/bit.26444

    Prediction of corn price fluctuation based on multiple linear regression analysis model under big data
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    Synthetic fungal multifunctional cellulases for enhanced biomass conversion
    journal, January 2020

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    • Green Chemistry, Vol. 22, Issue 2
    • DOI: 10.1039/c9gc03062j

    VOC emissions from the combustion of low-grade lignocellulosic waste
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    Zymomonas mobilis as a model system for production of biofuels and biochemicals
    journal, September 2016