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Title: CO2 storage in the Paluxy formation at the Kemper County CO2 storage complex: Pore network properties and simulated reactive permeability evolution

Abstract

The Paluxy formation is being considered as a prospective CO2 reservoir at the Kemper County CO2 Storage Complex. Herein, the pore and pore-throat size distributions and connectivity of the Paluxy formation is evaluated through analysis of 3D X-ray Computed Tomography images. In spite of resolution limitations that constrain the pore-throat sizes detectable by imaging, the permeability contributing pore-throats are successfully characterized through 3D imaging analysis. Image-obtained pore and pore-throat size distributions and pore connectivity are then utilized to construct pore network models and simulate permeability. After CO2 is injected, it will dissolve into formation brine and create conditions favorable for dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary minerals. These reactions will alter the porosity and permeability of the system to varying degrees depending on the spatial location of reactions. In this research, the possible porosity-permeability evolution is simulated using pore network models considering mineral reactions occurring uniformly and non-uniformly throughout the network. For a given change in porosity, there is a large range of possible permeability outcomes. Depending on the extent and spatial location of mineral reactions, permeability may decrease by more than one order of magnitude as minerals precipitate. During dissolution, simulated permeability increases as much as 500%.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Auburn Univ., AL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Southern States Energy Board, Peachtree Corners, GA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1618114
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1780100
Report Number(s):
DOE-SSEB-0029465-38
Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Grant/Contract Number:  
FE0029465
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 93; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 1750-5836
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; CO2 sequestration; Pore network modeling; Mineral dissolution; Permeability

Citation Formats

Bensinger, Jacob, and Beckingham, Lauren E. CO2 storage in the Paluxy formation at the Kemper County CO2 storage complex: Pore network properties and simulated reactive permeability evolution. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2019.102887.
Bensinger, Jacob, & Beckingham, Lauren E. CO2 storage in the Paluxy formation at the Kemper County CO2 storage complex: Pore network properties and simulated reactive permeability evolution. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2019.102887
Bensinger, Jacob, and Beckingham, Lauren E. Mon . "CO2 storage in the Paluxy formation at the Kemper County CO2 storage complex: Pore network properties and simulated reactive permeability evolution". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijggc.2019.102887. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1618114.
@article{osti_1618114,
title = {CO2 storage in the Paluxy formation at the Kemper County CO2 storage complex: Pore network properties and simulated reactive permeability evolution},
author = {Bensinger, Jacob and Beckingham, Lauren E.},
abstractNote = {The Paluxy formation is being considered as a prospective CO2 reservoir at the Kemper County CO2 Storage Complex. Herein, the pore and pore-throat size distributions and connectivity of the Paluxy formation is evaluated through analysis of 3D X-ray Computed Tomography images. In spite of resolution limitations that constrain the pore-throat sizes detectable by imaging, the permeability contributing pore-throats are successfully characterized through 3D imaging analysis. Image-obtained pore and pore-throat size distributions and pore connectivity are then utilized to construct pore network models and simulate permeability. After CO2 is injected, it will dissolve into formation brine and create conditions favorable for dissolution of primary minerals and precipitation of secondary minerals. These reactions will alter the porosity and permeability of the system to varying degrees depending on the spatial location of reactions. In this research, the possible porosity-permeability evolution is simulated using pore network models considering mineral reactions occurring uniformly and non-uniformly throughout the network. For a given change in porosity, there is a large range of possible permeability outcomes. Depending on the extent and spatial location of mineral reactions, permeability may decrease by more than one order of magnitude as minerals precipitate. During dissolution, simulated permeability increases as much as 500%.},
doi = {10.1016/j.ijggc.2019.102887},
journal = {International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control},
number = C,
volume = 93,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}