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Title: Forward modeling of Doppler velocity interferometer system for improved shockwave measurements

Abstract

We report that when near-instantaneous shocks are recorded by using a Doppler velocity interferometer velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR), they typically exceed the detector’s ability to react and “skipped fringes” result, where its visibility briefly reduces. Traditionally, replacing skipped fringes required guesswork in analysis, which increased arrival time errors. Second, the use of long but velocity-sensitive interferometer delays with fast detectors which can resolve the delay has traditionally been avoided because of the fear of confusing the arrival time signal. However, shorter delays produce smaller fringe phase shifts per velocity and, thus, can decrease velocity precision. We realize that while some loss of fringe information occurs at shock events, this is often just a partial loss and the residual fringe information can still hold valuable information. We describe a forward model (FM) of the interferometer action and detector blurring that assists with VISAR fringe analysis at skipping events: (1) more precise shock arrival times, (2) arrival time precision not limited by long delays, and (3) improved ghost subtraction, which improves accuracy over a broad time region. Lastly, we demonstrate the utility of a FM on National Ignition Facility and Laboratory for Laser Energetics Omega shots and discuss datamore » process methods to increase the high time resolution of VISAR systems despite their limitations and complexities.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1614963
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-766240
Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748; 956430
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Review of Scientific Instruments
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 91; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0034-6748
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Erskine, David J. Forward modeling of Doppler velocity interferometer system for improved shockwave measurements. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5143246.
Erskine, David J. Forward modeling of Doppler velocity interferometer system for improved shockwave measurements. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5143246
Erskine, David J. Thu . "Forward modeling of Doppler velocity interferometer system for improved shockwave measurements". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1063/1.5143246. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1614963.
@article{osti_1614963,
title = {Forward modeling of Doppler velocity interferometer system for improved shockwave measurements},
author = {Erskine, David J.},
abstractNote = {We report that when near-instantaneous shocks are recorded by using a Doppler velocity interferometer velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR), they typically exceed the detector’s ability to react and “skipped fringes” result, where its visibility briefly reduces. Traditionally, replacing skipped fringes required guesswork in analysis, which increased arrival time errors. Second, the use of long but velocity-sensitive interferometer delays with fast detectors which can resolve the delay has traditionally been avoided because of the fear of confusing the arrival time signal. However, shorter delays produce smaller fringe phase shifts per velocity and, thus, can decrease velocity precision. We realize that while some loss of fringe information occurs at shock events, this is often just a partial loss and the residual fringe information can still hold valuable information. We describe a forward model (FM) of the interferometer action and detector blurring that assists with VISAR fringe analysis at skipping events: (1) more precise shock arrival times, (2) arrival time precision not limited by long delays, and (3) improved ghost subtraction, which improves accuracy over a broad time region. Lastly, we demonstrate the utility of a FM on National Ignition Facility and Laboratory for Laser Energetics Omega shots and discuss data process methods to increase the high time resolution of VISAR systems despite their limitations and complexities.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5143246},
journal = {Review of Scientific Instruments},
number = 4,
volume = 91,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {4}
}

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