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Title: The Viscosity and Atomic Structure of Volatile-Bearing Melilititic Melts at High Pressure and Temperature and the Transport of Deep Carbon

Abstract

Understanding the viscosity of mantle-derived magmas is needed to model their migration mechanisms and ascent rate from the source rock to the surface. High pressure–temperature experimental data are now available on the viscosity of synthetic melts, pure carbonatitic to carbonate–silicate compositions, anhydrous basalts, dacites and rhyolites. However, the viscosity of volatile-bearing melilititic melts, among the most plausible carriers of deep carbon, has not been investigated. In this study, we experimentally determined the viscosity of synthetic liquids with ~31 and ~39 wt% SiO2, 1.60 and 1.42 wt% CO2 and 5.7 and 1 wt% H2O, respectively, at pressures from 1 to 4.7 GPa and temperatures between 1265 and 1755 °C, using the falling-sphere technique combined with in situ X-ray radiography. Our results show viscosities between 0.1044 and 2.1221 Pa·s, with a clear dependence on temperature and SiO2 content. The atomic structure of both melt compositions was also determined at high pressure and temperature, using in situ multi-angle energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction supported by ex situ microFTIR and microRaman spectroscopic measurements. Our results yield evidence that the T–T and T–O (T = Si,Al) interatomic distances of ultrabasic melts are higher than those for basaltic melts known from similar recent studies. Based on our experimentalmore » data, melilititic melts are expected to migrate at a rate ~from 2 to 57 km·yr-1 in the present-day or the Archaean mantle, respectively.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8]; ORCiD logo [9];  [10]
  1. Sapienza Univ. of Rome (Italy); National Inst. of Geophysics and Volcanology, Rome (Italy)
  2. Sapienza Univ. of Rome (Italy)
  3. Ehime Univ., Matsuyama (Japan)
  4. National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Rome (Italy)
  5. National Inst. of Nuclear Physics (INFN), Rome (Italy); Sapienza Univ. of Rome (Italy)
  6. Univ. of Studies Roma Tre, Rome (Italy)
  7. Univ. of Chieti-Pescara, Chieti Scalo (Italy)
  8. Carnegie Inst. of Science, Washington, DC (United States). Geophysical Lab.
  9. National Inst. of Geophysics and Volcanology, Rome (Italy)
  10. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1608862
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Minerals
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 2075-163X
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; viscosity; melt structure; high pressure; falling-sphere technique; ultrabasic melt; Paris–Edinburgh press; magma ascent rate; migration rate

Citation Formats

Stagno, Vincenzo, Stopponi, Veronica, Kono, Yoshio, D’Arco, Annalisa, Lupi, Stefano, Romano, Claudia, Poe, Brent T., Foustoukos, Dionysis I., Scarlato, Piergiorgio, and Manning, Craig E. The Viscosity and Atomic Structure of Volatile-Bearing Melilititic Melts at High Pressure and Temperature and the Transport of Deep Carbon. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.3390/min10030267.
Stagno, Vincenzo, Stopponi, Veronica, Kono, Yoshio, D’Arco, Annalisa, Lupi, Stefano, Romano, Claudia, Poe, Brent T., Foustoukos, Dionysis I., Scarlato, Piergiorgio, & Manning, Craig E. The Viscosity and Atomic Structure of Volatile-Bearing Melilititic Melts at High Pressure and Temperature and the Transport of Deep Carbon. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/min10030267
Stagno, Vincenzo, Stopponi, Veronica, Kono, Yoshio, D’Arco, Annalisa, Lupi, Stefano, Romano, Claudia, Poe, Brent T., Foustoukos, Dionysis I., Scarlato, Piergiorgio, and Manning, Craig E. Mon . "The Viscosity and Atomic Structure of Volatile-Bearing Melilititic Melts at High Pressure and Temperature and the Transport of Deep Carbon". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.3390/min10030267. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1608862.
@article{osti_1608862,
title = {The Viscosity and Atomic Structure of Volatile-Bearing Melilititic Melts at High Pressure and Temperature and the Transport of Deep Carbon},
author = {Stagno, Vincenzo and Stopponi, Veronica and Kono, Yoshio and D’Arco, Annalisa and Lupi, Stefano and Romano, Claudia and Poe, Brent T. and Foustoukos, Dionysis I. and Scarlato, Piergiorgio and Manning, Craig E.},
abstractNote = {Understanding the viscosity of mantle-derived magmas is needed to model their migration mechanisms and ascent rate from the source rock to the surface. High pressure–temperature experimental data are now available on the viscosity of synthetic melts, pure carbonatitic to carbonate–silicate compositions, anhydrous basalts, dacites and rhyolites. However, the viscosity of volatile-bearing melilititic melts, among the most plausible carriers of deep carbon, has not been investigated. In this study, we experimentally determined the viscosity of synthetic liquids with ~31 and ~39 wt% SiO2, 1.60 and 1.42 wt% CO2 and 5.7 and 1 wt% H2O, respectively, at pressures from 1 to 4.7 GPa and temperatures between 1265 and 1755 °C, using the falling-sphere technique combined with in situ X-ray radiography. Our results show viscosities between 0.1044 and 2.1221 Pa·s, with a clear dependence on temperature and SiO2 content. The atomic structure of both melt compositions was also determined at high pressure and temperature, using in situ multi-angle energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction supported by ex situ microFTIR and microRaman spectroscopic measurements. Our results yield evidence that the T–T and T–O (T = Si,Al) interatomic distances of ultrabasic melts are higher than those for basaltic melts known from similar recent studies. Based on our experimental data, melilititic melts are expected to migrate at a rate ~from 2 to 57 km·yr-1 in the present-day or the Archaean mantle, respectively.},
doi = {10.3390/min10030267},
journal = {Minerals},
number = 3,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {3}
}

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