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Title: Dissolved Organic Matter Affects Arsenic Mobility and Iron(III) (hydr)oxide Formation: Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge

Abstract

During managed aquifer recharge (MAR), injected water significantly alters water chemistry in an aquifer, affecting arsenic mobility. To elucidate the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on arsenic mobilization during MAR, this bench-scale study examined arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite (FeAsS, an arsenic-containing sulfide) in the presence of Suwannee River natural organic matter, humic acid, and fulvic acid (SRNOM, SRHA, and SRFA), alginate (Alg), polyaspartate (PA), and glutamate (Glu). Suwannee River DOM (SRDOM) decreased arsenic mobility in the short term (<6 h) via inhibiting arsenopyrite oxidative dissolution, but increased arsenic mobility over a longer experimental time (~7 days) via inhibiting secondary iron(III) (hydr)oxide precipitation and decreasing arsenic adsorption onto iron(III) (hydr)oxide. In situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering measurements indicated that SRDOM decreased iron(III) (hydr)oxide nucleus sizes and growth rates. A combined analysis of SRDOM and other proteinaceous or labile DOM (Alg, PA, and Glu) revealed that DOM with higher molecular weights would cause more increased arsenic mobility. Finally, these new observations advance our understanding of the impacts of DOM in injected water on arsenic mobility and secondary precipitate formation during MAR, and in other systems where interactions between DOM, arsenic, and iron(III) (hydr)oxides take place.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)
  2. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Missouri Univ. of Science and Technology, Rolla, MO (United States)
  3. Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States); Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)
  4. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). X-ray Science Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES). Scientific User Facilities Division; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1607993
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 53; Journal Issue: 24; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Adsorption; Dissolved organic matter; Dissolution; Arsenic; Minerals

Citation Formats

Wu, Xuanhao, Bowers, Brandon, Kim, Doyoon, Lee, Byeongdu, and Jun, Young-Shin. Dissolved Organic Matter Affects Arsenic Mobility and Iron(III) (hydr)oxide Formation: Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.est.9b04873.
Wu, Xuanhao, Bowers, Brandon, Kim, Doyoon, Lee, Byeongdu, & Jun, Young-Shin. Dissolved Organic Matter Affects Arsenic Mobility and Iron(III) (hydr)oxide Formation: Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b04873
Wu, Xuanhao, Bowers, Brandon, Kim, Doyoon, Lee, Byeongdu, and Jun, Young-Shin. Wed . "Dissolved Organic Matter Affects Arsenic Mobility and Iron(III) (hydr)oxide Formation: Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b04873. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1607993.
@article{osti_1607993,
title = {Dissolved Organic Matter Affects Arsenic Mobility and Iron(III) (hydr)oxide Formation: Implications for Managed Aquifer Recharge},
author = {Wu, Xuanhao and Bowers, Brandon and Kim, Doyoon and Lee, Byeongdu and Jun, Young-Shin},
abstractNote = {During managed aquifer recharge (MAR), injected water significantly alters water chemistry in an aquifer, affecting arsenic mobility. To elucidate the effects of dissolved organic matter (DOM) on arsenic mobilization during MAR, this bench-scale study examined arsenic mobilization from arsenopyrite (FeAsS, an arsenic-containing sulfide) in the presence of Suwannee River natural organic matter, humic acid, and fulvic acid (SRNOM, SRHA, and SRFA), alginate (Alg), polyaspartate (PA), and glutamate (Glu). Suwannee River DOM (SRDOM) decreased arsenic mobility in the short term (<6 h) via inhibiting arsenopyrite oxidative dissolution, but increased arsenic mobility over a longer experimental time (~7 days) via inhibiting secondary iron(III) (hydr)oxide precipitation and decreasing arsenic adsorption onto iron(III) (hydr)oxide. In situ grazing incidence small-angle X-ray scattering measurements indicated that SRDOM decreased iron(III) (hydr)oxide nucleus sizes and growth rates. A combined analysis of SRDOM and other proteinaceous or labile DOM (Alg, PA, and Glu) revealed that DOM with higher molecular weights would cause more increased arsenic mobility. Finally, these new observations advance our understanding of the impacts of DOM in injected water on arsenic mobility and secondary precipitate formation during MAR, and in other systems where interactions between DOM, arsenic, and iron(III) (hydr)oxides take place.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.9b04873},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 24,
volume = 53,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Aqueous arsenic concentrations in the presence of different model SRDOM and in the control system over 6 hours (A) and 7 days (B). Error bars represent the standard deviation from triplicate batch experiments. For 6 hours results, a t-Test showed that, at the 0.05 significance level, the p-valuesmore » of the three SRDOM systems (SRNOM: 0.0119; SRHA: 0.00373; SRFA: 0.00686) were <0.05, indicating that the concentration differences between the SRDOM systems and the control system were statistically significant.« less

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