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Title: Approaches to investigate the role of chelation in the corrosivity of biomass-derived oils

Abstract

The need to provide the U.S. market with a renewable liquid fuel energy source from a non-food feedstock stream has gained considerable traction due to benefits such as improved energy efficiency, reduced environmental impacts, and enhanced national security. Practical achievement of these goals via biomass and bio-waste utilization involves production of liquid intermediates containing corrosive, reactive species like carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, and hydroxyaldehydes. Such mixtures challenge materials of containment, processing, and transport. It is widely recognized that the smaller organic acids, such as acetic and formic, are corrosive and can remove protective surface oxides on alloys used in bio-oil processing infrastructure, and ketones can swell sealing polymers. However, literature shows, and findings herein confirm, larger carboxylic acids and bidentate alcohols are present. This highlights the potential for synergistic, detrimental effects of constituents in bio-oil corrosion, including direct reactivity of small acids compounded with the possibility of mobilization of protective metal oxide layers via chelation by larger acids and oxygenates. The question of whether species beyond small acids can significantly contribute to corrosion requires analytical approaches previously not applied to bio-oil corrosion studies and certainly not previously applied corroboratively. As such, this work introduces a combination of optical, mass spectral,more » and electrochemical impedance spectroscopies with an incubation approach to study metal mobilization, to facilitate elucidating chelation's role in bio-oil corrosive pathways. To enable systematic study of these oxygenates' material compatibility individually and in combination, a model matrix of bio-oil constituents was also developed based on identification of key components of real bio-oils.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Transportation Office. Bioenergy Technologies Office
OSTI Identifier:
1607167
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1580003
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Biomass and Bioenergy
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 133; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0961-9534
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; Biomass; Corrosion; Raman; Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry; Electrical impedance spectroscopy; Alloy metal leaching

Citation Formats

Connatser, Raynella M., Frith, Matthew G., Jun, Jiheon, Lewis. Sr., Samuel A., Brady, Michael P., and Keiser, James R.. Approaches to investigate the role of chelation in the corrosivity of biomass-derived oils. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biombioe.2019.105446.
Connatser, Raynella M., Frith, Matthew G., Jun, Jiheon, Lewis. Sr., Samuel A., Brady, Michael P., & Keiser, James R.. Approaches to investigate the role of chelation in the corrosivity of biomass-derived oils. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biombioe.2019.105446
Connatser, Raynella M., Frith, Matthew G., Jun, Jiheon, Lewis. Sr., Samuel A., Brady, Michael P., and Keiser, James R.. Thu . "Approaches to investigate the role of chelation in the corrosivity of biomass-derived oils". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biombioe.2019.105446. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1607167.
@article{osti_1607167,
title = {Approaches to investigate the role of chelation in the corrosivity of biomass-derived oils},
author = {Connatser, Raynella M. and Frith, Matthew G. and Jun, Jiheon and Lewis. Sr., Samuel A. and Brady, Michael P. and Keiser, James R.},
abstractNote = {The need to provide the U.S. market with a renewable liquid fuel energy source from a non-food feedstock stream has gained considerable traction due to benefits such as improved energy efficiency, reduced environmental impacts, and enhanced national security. Practical achievement of these goals via biomass and bio-waste utilization involves production of liquid intermediates containing corrosive, reactive species like carboxylic acids, ketones, aldehydes, and hydroxyaldehydes. Such mixtures challenge materials of containment, processing, and transport. It is widely recognized that the smaller organic acids, such as acetic and formic, are corrosive and can remove protective surface oxides on alloys used in bio-oil processing infrastructure, and ketones can swell sealing polymers. However, literature shows, and findings herein confirm, larger carboxylic acids and bidentate alcohols are present. This highlights the potential for synergistic, detrimental effects of constituents in bio-oil corrosion, including direct reactivity of small acids compounded with the possibility of mobilization of protective metal oxide layers via chelation by larger acids and oxygenates. The question of whether species beyond small acids can significantly contribute to corrosion requires analytical approaches previously not applied to bio-oil corrosion studies and certainly not previously applied corroboratively. As such, this work introduces a combination of optical, mass spectral, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopies with an incubation approach to study metal mobilization, to facilitate elucidating chelation's role in bio-oil corrosive pathways. To enable systematic study of these oxygenates' material compatibility individually and in combination, a model matrix of bio-oil constituents was also developed based on identification of key components of real bio-oils.},
doi = {10.1016/j.biombioe.2019.105446},
journal = {Biomass and Bioenergy},
number = C,
volume = 133,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {12}
}

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Cited by: 2 works
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