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Title: Knitting while Australia burns

Abstract

A global biodiversity hotspot, Australia has reached a tipping point from which many of its forests may never recover. Record-breaking heat, drought and windy conditions have burned at least 10 million hectares. Halfway through the season, fires have persisted for months with no end in sight. Here, the continent faces an exponential rise in future wildfire risk as the climate warms and dries.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1606704
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Climate Change
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1758-678X
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; climate change; conservation biology; fire ecology

Citation Formats

Jager, Henriette I., and Coutant, Charles C. Knitting while Australia burns. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.1038/s41558-020-0710-7.
Jager, Henriette I., & Coutant, Charles C. Knitting while Australia burns. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-0710-7
Jager, Henriette I., and Coutant, Charles C. Mon . "Knitting while Australia burns". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1038/s41558-020-0710-7. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1606704.
@article{osti_1606704,
title = {Knitting while Australia burns},
author = {Jager, Henriette I. and Coutant, Charles C.},
abstractNote = {A global biodiversity hotspot, Australia has reached a tipping point from which many of its forests may never recover. Record-breaking heat, drought and windy conditions have burned at least 10 million hectares. Halfway through the season, fires have persisted for months with no end in sight. Here, the continent faces an exponential rise in future wildfire risk as the climate warms and dries.},
doi = {10.1038/s41558-020-0710-7},
journal = {Nature Climate Change},
number = 3,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {2}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

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Cited by: 2 works
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Works referenced in this record:

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Interactions between wildfire and drought drive population responses of mammals in coastal woodlands
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