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Title: Impact of Chemical and Mechanical Processes on Leakage from Damaged Wells in CO2 Storage Sites

Abstract

The perceived risk of CO2 leakage through wells has been considered a potential limitation to commercial scale deployment of geologic CO2 storage. However, chemical and mechanical alteration of cement can reduce the permeability of leakage pathways. We conducted 100s of simulations spanning realistic operating conditions and well-damage characteristics to understand (1) under what conditions and time frames do fractures seal and (2) for fractures that do not seal, how quickly and to what extent is the permeability reduced. For the conditions simulated, fractures with apertures in the tens of microns seal while those greater than hundreds of microns may exhibit long-term leakage. Fractures with apertures between 10 and 500 μm took a few days to a couple of years to seal. For non-sealing fractures mechanical deformation of altered asperities can rapidly reduce permeability. Here, a sealing criterion was developed to relate fracture aperture with the cemented length required for self-sealing. Longer cemented intervals can seal large fractures; however, they take longer to seal and leak larger volumes before sealing. While the results presented here are subject to uncertainties, the manuscript provides a framework in which a model can be used to quantitatively answer questions regarding well integrity to facilitate decisionmore » making.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1603235
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-783444
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X; 979146
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Iyer, Jaisree, Chen, Xiao, and Carroll, Susan A. Impact of Chemical and Mechanical Processes on Leakage from Damaged Wells in CO2 Storage Sites. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b05039.
Iyer, Jaisree, Chen, Xiao, & Carroll, Susan A. Impact of Chemical and Mechanical Processes on Leakage from Damaged Wells in CO2 Storage Sites. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b05039
Iyer, Jaisree, Chen, Xiao, and Carroll, Susan A. Tue . "Impact of Chemical and Mechanical Processes on Leakage from Damaged Wells in CO2 Storage Sites". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b05039. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1603235.
@article{osti_1603235,
title = {Impact of Chemical and Mechanical Processes on Leakage from Damaged Wells in CO2 Storage Sites},
author = {Iyer, Jaisree and Chen, Xiao and Carroll, Susan A.},
abstractNote = {The perceived risk of CO2 leakage through wells has been considered a potential limitation to commercial scale deployment of geologic CO2 storage. However, chemical and mechanical alteration of cement can reduce the permeability of leakage pathways. We conducted 100s of simulations spanning realistic operating conditions and well-damage characteristics to understand (1) under what conditions and time frames do fractures seal and (2) for fractures that do not seal, how quickly and to what extent is the permeability reduced. For the conditions simulated, fractures with apertures in the tens of microns seal while those greater than hundreds of microns may exhibit long-term leakage. Fractures with apertures between 10 and 500 μm took a few days to a couple of years to seal. For non-sealing fractures mechanical deformation of altered asperities can rapidly reduce permeability. Here, a sealing criterion was developed to relate fracture aperture with the cemented length required for self-sealing. Longer cemented intervals can seal large fractures; however, they take longer to seal and leak larger volumes before sealing. While the results presented here are subject to uncertainties, the manuscript provides a framework in which a model can be used to quantitatively answer questions regarding well integrity to facilitate decision making.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.9b05039},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 2,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

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