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Title: In-Situ Metabolomic Analysis of Setaria viridis Roots Colonized by Beneficial Endophytic Bacteria

Abstract

Over the past decades, crop yields have risen in parallel with increasing use of fossil-fuel derived nitrogen (N) fertilizers, but with concomitant negative impacts on climate and water resources. There is a need for more sustainable agricultural practices, and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) could be part of the solution. A variety of nitrogen-fixing, epiphytic and endophytic plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) are known to stimulate plant growth. However, compared to the rhizobium-legume symbiosis, little mechanistic information is available as to how PGPB affect plant metabolism. Therefore, we investigated the metabolic changes in roots of the model grass species Setaria viridis upon endophytic colonization by Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 (fix+) or a fix- mutant strain (SmR54), compared to uninoculated roots. Endophytic colonization of the root is highly localized and, hence, analysis of whole root segments dilutes the metabolic signature of those few cells impacted by the bacteria. Therefore, we utilized in situ laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) to sample only those root segments at or adjacent to the sites of bacterial colonization. We report netabolites involved in purine, zeatin, and riboflavin pathways were significantly more abundant in inoculated plants while metabolites indicative of nitrogen, starch, and sucrose metabolism were reducedmore » in roots inoculated with the fix- strain or uninoculated, presumably due to N limitation. Interestingly, compounds, involved in indole-alkaloid biosynthesis were more abundant in the roots colonized by the fix- strain, perhaps reflecting a plant defense response.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [4];  [5];  [5];  [5];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)
  2. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC (United States)
  3. Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Federal Univ. of Paraná, Curitiba (Brazil)
  4. Federal Univ. of Paraná, Curitiba (Brazil)
  5. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Sciences Lab. (EMSL)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1602752
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-145863
Journal ID: ISSN 0894-0282
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 33; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-0282
Publisher:
APS Press - International Society for Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; nitrogen fixation; metabolites; Herbaspirillum seropedicae; PGPB; associative bacteria; plant growth promotion; nifA; rhizosphere; mass spectrometry; laser ablation electrospray; ionization

Citation Formats

Agtuca, Beverly J., Stopka, Sylwia A., Tuleski, Thalita R., do Amaral, Fernanda P., Evans, Sterling, Liu, Yang, Xu, Dong, Monteiro, Rose Adele, Koppenaal, David W., Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana, Anderton, Christopher R., Vertes, Akos, and Stacey, Gary. In-Situ Metabolomic Analysis of Setaria viridis Roots Colonized by Beneficial Endophytic Bacteria. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-06-19-0174-R.
Agtuca, Beverly J., Stopka, Sylwia A., Tuleski, Thalita R., do Amaral, Fernanda P., Evans, Sterling, Liu, Yang, Xu, Dong, Monteiro, Rose Adele, Koppenaal, David W., Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana, Anderton, Christopher R., Vertes, Akos, & Stacey, Gary. In-Situ Metabolomic Analysis of Setaria viridis Roots Colonized by Beneficial Endophytic Bacteria. United States. https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-06-19-0174-R
Agtuca, Beverly J., Stopka, Sylwia A., Tuleski, Thalita R., do Amaral, Fernanda P., Evans, Sterling, Liu, Yang, Xu, Dong, Monteiro, Rose Adele, Koppenaal, David W., Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana, Anderton, Christopher R., Vertes, Akos, and Stacey, Gary. Fri . "In-Situ Metabolomic Analysis of Setaria viridis Roots Colonized by Beneficial Endophytic Bacteria". United States. https://doi.org/10.1094/MPMI-06-19-0174-R. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1602752.
@article{osti_1602752,
title = {In-Situ Metabolomic Analysis of Setaria viridis Roots Colonized by Beneficial Endophytic Bacteria},
author = {Agtuca, Beverly J. and Stopka, Sylwia A. and Tuleski, Thalita R. and do Amaral, Fernanda P. and Evans, Sterling and Liu, Yang and Xu, Dong and Monteiro, Rose Adele and Koppenaal, David W. and Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana and Anderton, Christopher R. and Vertes, Akos and Stacey, Gary},
abstractNote = {Over the past decades, crop yields have risen in parallel with increasing use of fossil-fuel derived nitrogen (N) fertilizers, but with concomitant negative impacts on climate and water resources. There is a need for more sustainable agricultural practices, and biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) could be part of the solution. A variety of nitrogen-fixing, epiphytic and endophytic plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) are known to stimulate plant growth. However, compared to the rhizobium-legume symbiosis, little mechanistic information is available as to how PGPB affect plant metabolism. Therefore, we investigated the metabolic changes in roots of the model grass species Setaria viridis upon endophytic colonization by Herbaspirillum seropedicae SmR1 (fix+) or a fix- mutant strain (SmR54), compared to uninoculated roots. Endophytic colonization of the root is highly localized and, hence, analysis of whole root segments dilutes the metabolic signature of those few cells impacted by the bacteria. Therefore, we utilized in situ laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) to sample only those root segments at or adjacent to the sites of bacterial colonization. We report netabolites involved in purine, zeatin, and riboflavin pathways were significantly more abundant in inoculated plants while metabolites indicative of nitrogen, starch, and sucrose metabolism were reduced in roots inoculated with the fix- strain or uninoculated, presumably due to N limitation. Interestingly, compounds, involved in indole-alkaloid biosynthesis were more abundant in the roots colonized by the fix- strain, perhaps reflecting a plant defense response.},
doi = {10.1094/MPMI-06-19-0174-R},
journal = {Molecular Plant-Microbe Interactions},
number = 2,
volume = 33,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {12}
}

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