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Title: The effect of wind direction shear on turbine performance in a wind farm in central Iowa

Abstract

Numerous studies have shown that atmospheric conditions affect wind turbine performance; however, some findings have exposed conflicting results for different locations and diverse analysis methodologies. In this study, we explore how the change in wind direction with height (direction wind shear), a site-differing factor between conflicting studies, and speed shear affect wind turbine performance. We utilized lidar and turbine data collected from the 2013 Crop Wind Energy eXperiment (CWEX) project between June and September in a wind farm in north-central Iowa. Wind direction and speed shear were found to follow a diurnal cycle; however, they evolved differently with increasing wind speeds. Using a combination of speed and direction shear values, we found large direction and small speed shear to result in underperformance. We further analyzed the effects of wind veering on turbine performance for specific values of speed shear and found detrimental conditions on the order of 10 % for wind speed regimes predominantly located in the middle of the power curve. Focusing on a time period of ramping electricity demand (06:00–09:00 LT– local time) exposed the fact that large direction shear occurred during this time and undermined turbine performance by more than 10 %. A predominance of clockwise direction shear (windmore » veering) cases compared to counterclockwise (wind backing) was also observed throughout the campaign. Moreover, large veering was found to have greater detrimental effects on turbine performance compared to small backing values. This study shows that changes in wind direction with height should be considered when analyzing turbine performance.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)
  2. Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1600899
Report Number(s):
[NREL/JA-5000-76100]
[Journal ID: ISSN 2366-7451]
Grant/Contract Number:  
[AC36-08GO28308]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Wind Energy Science (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
[Journal Name: Wind Energy Science (Online); Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 1]; Journal ID: ISSN 2366-7451
Publisher:
European Wind Energy Association - Copernicus
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; wind direction; wind shear; wind turbines

Citation Formats

Sanchez Gomez, Miguel, and Lundquist, Julie K. The effect of wind direction shear on turbine performance in a wind farm in central Iowa. United States: N. p., 2020. Web. doi:10.5194/wes-5-125-2020.
Sanchez Gomez, Miguel, & Lundquist, Julie K. The effect of wind direction shear on turbine performance in a wind farm in central Iowa. United States. doi:10.5194/wes-5-125-2020.
Sanchez Gomez, Miguel, and Lundquist, Julie K. Wed . "The effect of wind direction shear on turbine performance in a wind farm in central Iowa". United States. doi:10.5194/wes-5-125-2020. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1600899.
@article{osti_1600899,
title = {The effect of wind direction shear on turbine performance in a wind farm in central Iowa},
author = {Sanchez Gomez, Miguel and Lundquist, Julie K.},
abstractNote = {Numerous studies have shown that atmospheric conditions affect wind turbine performance; however, some findings have exposed conflicting results for different locations and diverse analysis methodologies. In this study, we explore how the change in wind direction with height (direction wind shear), a site-differing factor between conflicting studies, and speed shear affect wind turbine performance. We utilized lidar and turbine data collected from the 2013 Crop Wind Energy eXperiment (CWEX) project between June and September in a wind farm in north-central Iowa. Wind direction and speed shear were found to follow a diurnal cycle; however, they evolved differently with increasing wind speeds. Using a combination of speed and direction shear values, we found large direction and small speed shear to result in underperformance. We further analyzed the effects of wind veering on turbine performance for specific values of speed shear and found detrimental conditions on the order of 10 % for wind speed regimes predominantly located in the middle of the power curve. Focusing on a time period of ramping electricity demand (06:00–09:00 LT– local time) exposed the fact that large direction shear occurred during this time and undermined turbine performance by more than 10 %. A predominance of clockwise direction shear (wind veering) cases compared to counterclockwise (wind backing) was also observed throughout the campaign. Moreover, large veering was found to have greater detrimental effects on turbine performance compared to small backing values. This study shows that changes in wind direction with height should be considered when analyzing turbine performance.},
doi = {10.5194/wes-5-125-2020},
journal = {Wind Energy Science (Online)},
number = [1],
volume = [5],
place = {United States},
year = {2020},
month = {1}
}

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