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Title: Simulation Comparisons of Particulate Emissions from Fires under Marginal and Critical Conditions

Abstract

Using a particulate emissions model developed for FIRETEC, we explore differences in particle emission profiles between high-intensity fires under critical conditions and low-intensity fires under marginal conditions. Simulations were performed in a chaparral shrubland and a coniferous pine forest representative of the southeast United States. In each case, simulations were carried out under marginal and critical fire conditions. Marginal fire conditions include high moisture levels and low winds, often desired for prescribed fires as these conditions produce a low-intensity burn with slower spread rates. Critical fire conditions include low moisture levels and high winds, which easily lead to uncontrollable wildfires which produce a high-intensity burn with faster spread rates. These simulations’ resultant particle emission profiles show critical fire conditions generate larger particle emission factors, higher total mass emissions, and a higher lofting potential of particles into the atmosphere when compared against marginal fire conditions but similar particle size distrubtions. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the emissions model was performed to evaluate key parameters which govern particle emission factor and particle size.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDA; USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1597361
Report Number(s):
[LA-UR-19-29898]
[Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4433; ATMOCZ]
Grant/Contract Number:  
[89233218CNA000001]
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Atmosphere (Basel)
Additional Journal Information:
[Journal Name: Atmosphere (Basel); Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 11]; Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4433
Publisher:
MDPI
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Earth Sciences; CFD Simulation; Particulate Emissions; Soot Formation

Citation Formats

Josephson, Alexander Jon, Castano, Daniel, Holmes, Marlin Jamell, and Linn, Rodman Ray. Simulation Comparisons of Particulate Emissions from Fires under Marginal and Critical Conditions. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/atmos10110704.
Josephson, Alexander Jon, Castano, Daniel, Holmes, Marlin Jamell, & Linn, Rodman Ray. Simulation Comparisons of Particulate Emissions from Fires under Marginal and Critical Conditions. United States. doi:10.3390/atmos10110704.
Josephson, Alexander Jon, Castano, Daniel, Holmes, Marlin Jamell, and Linn, Rodman Ray. Wed . "Simulation Comparisons of Particulate Emissions from Fires under Marginal and Critical Conditions". United States. doi:10.3390/atmos10110704. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1597361.
@article{osti_1597361,
title = {Simulation Comparisons of Particulate Emissions from Fires under Marginal and Critical Conditions},
author = {Josephson, Alexander Jon and Castano, Daniel and Holmes, Marlin Jamell and Linn, Rodman Ray},
abstractNote = {Using a particulate emissions model developed for FIRETEC, we explore differences in particle emission profiles between high-intensity fires under critical conditions and low-intensity fires under marginal conditions. Simulations were performed in a chaparral shrubland and a coniferous pine forest representative of the southeast United States. In each case, simulations were carried out under marginal and critical fire conditions. Marginal fire conditions include high moisture levels and low winds, often desired for prescribed fires as these conditions produce a low-intensity burn with slower spread rates. Critical fire conditions include low moisture levels and high winds, which easily lead to uncontrollable wildfires which produce a high-intensity burn with faster spread rates. These simulations’ resultant particle emission profiles show critical fire conditions generate larger particle emission factors, higher total mass emissions, and a higher lofting potential of particles into the atmosphere when compared against marginal fire conditions but similar particle size distrubtions. In addition, a sensitivity analysis of the emissions model was performed to evaluate key parameters which govern particle emission factor and particle size.},
doi = {10.3390/atmos10110704},
journal = {Atmosphere (Basel)},
number = [11],
volume = [10],
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

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