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Title: Diesel Soot and Amine-Containing Organic Sulfate Aerosols in an Arctic Oil Field

Abstract

The rapid decrease in Arctic sea ice is motivating development and increasing oil and gas extraction activities. Yet, few observations of these local Arctic emissions exist, limiting the understanding of impacts on atmospheric composition and climate. To address this knowledge gap, the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols was measured within the North Slope of Alaska oil fields during August and September 2016 using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and a time-of-flight aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ToF-ACSM). Plumes from oil and gas extraction activities were characterized by soot internally mixed with sulfate (matching diesel soot) and organic carbon particles containing aminium sulfate salts. Sea spray aerosol at the coastal site was frequently internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate, from multiphase chemical processing from elevated NOx and SO2 within the oil field. Background (nonplume) air masses were characterized by aged combustion aerosol. No periods of "clean" (nonpolluted) Arctic air were observed. The composition of the nonrefractory aerosol measured with the ACSM was similar during plume and background periods and was consistent with the mass concentrations of nonrefractory particles measured by ATOFMS. Two ultrafine aerosol growth events were determined during oil field background periods and were correlated with fine mode amine-containing particles.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  2. Baylor Univ., Waco, TX (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
  4. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER)
OSTI Identifier:
1597255
Report Number(s):
BNL-213597-2020-JAAM
Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0012704; SC0014620
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 54; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 0013-936X
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Gunsch, Matthew J., Liu, Jun, Moffett, Claire E., Sheesley, Rebecca J., Wang, Ningxin, Zhang, Qi, Watson, Thomas B., and Pratt, Kerri A.. Diesel Soot and Amine-Containing Organic Sulfate Aerosols in an Arctic Oil Field. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b04825.
Gunsch, Matthew J., Liu, Jun, Moffett, Claire E., Sheesley, Rebecca J., Wang, Ningxin, Zhang, Qi, Watson, Thomas B., & Pratt, Kerri A.. Diesel Soot and Amine-Containing Organic Sulfate Aerosols in an Arctic Oil Field. United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b04825
Gunsch, Matthew J., Liu, Jun, Moffett, Claire E., Sheesley, Rebecca J., Wang, Ningxin, Zhang, Qi, Watson, Thomas B., and Pratt, Kerri A.. Mon . "Diesel Soot and Amine-Containing Organic Sulfate Aerosols in an Arctic Oil Field". United States. https://doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.9b04825. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1597255.
@article{osti_1597255,
title = {Diesel Soot and Amine-Containing Organic Sulfate Aerosols in an Arctic Oil Field},
author = {Gunsch, Matthew J. and Liu, Jun and Moffett, Claire E. and Sheesley, Rebecca J. and Wang, Ningxin and Zhang, Qi and Watson, Thomas B. and Pratt, Kerri A.},
abstractNote = {The rapid decrease in Arctic sea ice is motivating development and increasing oil and gas extraction activities. Yet, few observations of these local Arctic emissions exist, limiting the understanding of impacts on atmospheric composition and climate. To address this knowledge gap, the chemical composition of atmospheric aerosols was measured within the North Slope of Alaska oil fields during August and September 2016 using an aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometer (ATOFMS) and a time-of-flight aerosol chemical speciation monitor (ToF-ACSM). Plumes from oil and gas extraction activities were characterized by soot internally mixed with sulfate (matching diesel soot) and organic carbon particles containing aminium sulfate salts. Sea spray aerosol at the coastal site was frequently internally mixed with sulfate and nitrate, from multiphase chemical processing from elevated NOx and SO2 within the oil field. Background (nonplume) air masses were characterized by aged combustion aerosol. No periods of "clean" (nonpolluted) Arctic air were observed. The composition of the nonrefractory aerosol measured with the ACSM was similar during plume and background periods and was consistent with the mass concentrations of nonrefractory particles measured by ATOFMS. Two ultrafine aerosol growth events were determined during oil field background periods and were correlated with fine mode amine-containing particles.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.est.9b04825},
journal = {Environmental Science and Technology},
number = 1,
volume = 54,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {12}
}

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