DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Reply to ‘Increases in temperature do not translate to increased flooding’

Abstract

Replying to Wasko et al. Nature Communications https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13613-4 (2019). We are thankful for the interest of Wasko et al.1 in our work2. The correspondence from Wasko et al. argued that our finding on the positive scaling rate between storm runoff extremes and temperature can be mainly attributed to snowmelt processes, and claimed that storm runoff extremes should have a negative scaling rate globally. However, we do not agree with their arguments for several reasons.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Wuhan Univ. (China); Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  2. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States)
  3. Wuhan Univ. (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC); National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC)
OSTI Identifier:
1591851
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; 51539009; 51579183
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 10; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; climate change; hydrology; natural hazards

Citation Formats

Yin, Jiabo, Gentine, Pierre, Guo, Shenglian, Zhou, Sha, Sullivan, Sylvia C., Zhang, Yao, Gu, Lei, and Liu, Pan. Reply to ‘Increases in temperature do not translate to increased flooding’. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41467-019-13613-4.
Yin, Jiabo, Gentine, Pierre, Guo, Shenglian, Zhou, Sha, Sullivan, Sylvia C., Zhang, Yao, Gu, Lei, & Liu, Pan. Reply to ‘Increases in temperature do not translate to increased flooding’. United States. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13613-4
Yin, Jiabo, Gentine, Pierre, Guo, Shenglian, Zhou, Sha, Sullivan, Sylvia C., Zhang, Yao, Gu, Lei, and Liu, Pan. Thu . "Reply to ‘Increases in temperature do not translate to increased flooding’". United States. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13613-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1591851.
@article{osti_1591851,
title = {Reply to ‘Increases in temperature do not translate to increased flooding’},
author = {Yin, Jiabo and Gentine, Pierre and Guo, Shenglian and Zhou, Sha and Sullivan, Sylvia C. and Zhang, Yao and Gu, Lei and Liu, Pan},
abstractNote = {Replying to Wasko et al. Nature Communications https://doi.org/10.1038/s41467-019-13613-4 (2019). We are thankful for the interest of Wasko et al.1 in our work2. The correspondence from Wasko et al. argued that our finding on the positive scaling rate between storm runoff extremes and temperature can be mainly attributed to snowmelt processes, and claimed that storm runoff extremes should have a negative scaling rate globally. However, we do not agree with their arguments for several reasons.},
doi = {10.1038/s41467-019-13613-4},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = 1,
volume = 10,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {12}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 9 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Climate-driven variability in the occurrence of major floods across North America and Europe
journal, September 2017


The peak structure and future changes of the relationships between extreme precipitation and temperature
journal, March 2017

  • Wang, Guiling; Wang, Dagang; Trenberth, Kevin E.
  • Nature Climate Change, Vol. 7, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1038/nclimate3239

Response of snow-dependent hydrologic extremes to continued global warming
journal, November 2012

  • Diffenbaugh, Noah S.; Scherer, Martin; Ashfaq, Moetasim
  • Nature Climate Change, Vol. 3, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1038/nclimate1732

Projected increases and shifts in rain-on-snow flood risk over western North America
journal, August 2018


Global projections of river flood risk in a warmer world: RIVER FLOOD RISK IN A WARMER WORLD
journal, February 2017

  • Alfieri, Lorenzo; Bisselink, Berny; Dottori, Francesco
  • Earth's Future, Vol. 5, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1002/2016EF000485

Critical impact of vegetation physiology on the continental hydrologic cycle in response to increasing CO2
text, January 2018

  • Lemordant, Léo; Gentine, Pierre; Swann, Abigail S.
  • Columbia University
  • DOI: 10.7916/d8f20gmm

A copula-based analysis of projected climate changes to bivariate flood quantiles
journal, November 2018


An empirical investigation into the effect of antecedent precipitation on flood volume
journal, December 2018


Global assessment of flood and storm extremes with increased temperatures
journal, August 2017


Increases in temperature do not translate to increased flooding
journal, December 2019


A climatology of snowfall-temperature relationships in Canada
journal, May 1999

  • Davis, Robert E.; Lowit, Michael B.; Knappenberger, Paul C.
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 104, Issue D10
  • DOI: 10.1029/1999jd900104

Large increase in global storm runoff extremes driven by climate and anthropogenic changes
journal, October 2018


Nonstationarity: Flood Magnification and Recurrence Reduction Factors in the United States1: Nonstationarity: Flood Magnification and Recurrence Reduction Factors in the United States
journal, June 2011

  • Vogel, Richard M.; Yaindl, Chad; Walter, Meghan
  • JAWRA Journal of the American Water Resources Association, Vol. 47, Issue 3
  • DOI: 10.1111/j.1752-1688.2011.00541.x

Increase in hourly precipitation extremes beyond expectations from temperature changes
journal, July 2008

  • Lenderink, Geert; van Meijgaard, Erik
  • Nature Geoscience, Vol. 1, Issue 8
  • DOI: 10.1038/ngeo262

Dynamic responses of terrestrial ecosystem carbon cycling to global climate change
journal, May 1998

  • Cao, Mingkui; Woodward, F. Ian
  • Nature, Vol. 393, Issue 6682
  • DOI: 10.1038/30460

Complexity in estimating past and future extreme short-duration rainfall
journal, March 2017

  • Zhang, Xuebin; Zwiers, Francis W.; Li, Guilong
  • Nature Geoscience, Vol. 10, Issue 4
  • DOI: 10.1038/ngeo2911

SCS Runoff Equation Revisited for Variable-Source Runoff Areas
journal, May 1995


A global-scale investigation of trends in annual maximum streamflow
journal, September 2017


Examining why trends in very heavy precipitation should not be mistaken for trends in very high river discharge
journal, August 2015


Critical impact of vegetation physiology on the continental hydrologic cycle in response to increasing CO 2
journal, April 2018

  • Lemordant, Léo; Gentine, Pierre; Swann, Abigail S.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 115, Issue 16
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1720712115

The Cause of Decreased Pan Evaporation over the Past 50 Years
journal, November 2002


Works referencing / citing this record:

Projected increases in magnitude and socioeconomic exposure of global droughts in 1.5 and 2 °C warmer climates
journal, January 2020


Responses of Precipitation and Runoff to Climate Warming and Implications for Future Drought Changes in China
journal, October 2020


Increases in temperature do not translate to increased flooding
journal, December 2019