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Title: Transport Properties of Nanoporous, Chemically Forced Biological Lattices

Abstract

Permselective nanochannels are ubiquitous in biological systems, controlling ion transport and maintaining a potential difference across a cell surface. Surface layers (S-layers) are proteinaceous, generally charged lattices punctuated with nanoscale pores that form the outermost cell envelope component of virtually all archaea and many bacteria. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) obtain their energy exclusively from oxidizing ammonia directly below the S-layer lattice, but how the charged surfaces and nanochannels affect availability of NH4+ at the reaction site is unknown. In this report, we examine the electrochemical properties of negatively charged S-layers for asymmetrically forced ion transport governed by Michaelis–Menten kinetics at ultralow concentrations. Our 3-dimensional electrodiffusion reaction simulations revealed that a negatively charged S-layer can invert the potential across the nanochannel to favor chemically forced NH 4 + transport, analogous to polarity switching in nanofluidic field-effect transistors. Polarity switching was not observed when only the interior of the nanochannels was charged. We found that S-layer charge, nanochannel geometry, and enzymatic turnover rate are finely tuned to elevate NH 4 + concentration at the active site, potentially enabling AOA to occupy nutrient-poor ecological niches. Strikingly, and in contrast to voltage-biased systems, magnitudes of the co- and counterion currents in the charged nanochannelsmore » were nearly equal and amplified disproportionally to the NH 4 + current. These simulations imply that engineered arrays of crystalline proteinaceous membranes could find unique applications in industrial energy conversion or separation processes.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  2. Stanford Univ., CA (United States)
  3. Stanford Univ., CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1583133
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-76SF00515; GM123159
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Physical Chemistry. B, Condensed Matter, Materials, Surfaces, Interfaces and Biophysical Chemistry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: 49; Journal ID: ISSN 1520-6106
Publisher:
American Chemical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Li, Po-Nan, Herrmann, Jonathan, Wakatsuki, Soichi, and van den Bedem, Henry. Transport Properties of Nanoporous, Chemically Forced Biological Lattices. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcb.9b05882.
Li, Po-Nan, Herrmann, Jonathan, Wakatsuki, Soichi, & van den Bedem, Henry. Transport Properties of Nanoporous, Chemically Forced Biological Lattices. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcb.9b05882.
Li, Po-Nan, Herrmann, Jonathan, Wakatsuki, Soichi, and van den Bedem, Henry. Wed . "Transport Properties of Nanoporous, Chemically Forced Biological Lattices". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.jpcb.9b05882.
@article{osti_1583133,
title = {Transport Properties of Nanoporous, Chemically Forced Biological Lattices},
author = {Li, Po-Nan and Herrmann, Jonathan and Wakatsuki, Soichi and van den Bedem, Henry},
abstractNote = {Permselective nanochannels are ubiquitous in biological systems, controlling ion transport and maintaining a potential difference across a cell surface. Surface layers (S-layers) are proteinaceous, generally charged lattices punctuated with nanoscale pores that form the outermost cell envelope component of virtually all archaea and many bacteria. Ammonia oxidizing archaea (AOA) obtain their energy exclusively from oxidizing ammonia directly below the S-layer lattice, but how the charged surfaces and nanochannels affect availability of NH4+ at the reaction site is unknown. In this report, we examine the electrochemical properties of negatively charged S-layers for asymmetrically forced ion transport governed by Michaelis–Menten kinetics at ultralow concentrations. Our 3-dimensional electrodiffusion reaction simulations revealed that a negatively charged S-layer can invert the potential across the nanochannel to favor chemically forced NH4+ transport, analogous to polarity switching in nanofluidic field-effect transistors. Polarity switching was not observed when only the interior of the nanochannels was charged. We found that S-layer charge, nanochannel geometry, and enzymatic turnover rate are finely tuned to elevate NH4+ concentration at the active site, potentially enabling AOA to occupy nutrient-poor ecological niches. Strikingly, and in contrast to voltage-biased systems, magnitudes of the co- and counterion currents in the charged nanochannels were nearly equal and amplified disproportionally to the NH4+ current. These simulations imply that engineered arrays of crystalline proteinaceous membranes could find unique applications in industrial energy conversion or separation processes.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.jpcb.9b05882},
journal = {Journal of Physical Chemistry. B, Condensed Matter, Materials, Surfaces, Interfaces and Biophysical Chemistry},
number = 49,
volume = 123,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

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This content will become publicly available on November 13, 2020
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