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Title: Tundra microbial community taxa and traits predict decomposition parameters of stable, old soil organic carbon

Abstract

The susceptibility of soil organic carbon (SOC) in tundra to microbial decomposition under warmer climate scenarios potentially threatens a massive positive feedback to climate change, but the underlying mechanisms of stable SOC decomposition remain elusive. Herein, Alaskan tundra soils from three depths (a fibric O horizon with litter and course roots, an O horizon with decomposing litter and roots, and a mineral-organic mix, laying just above the permafrost) were incubated. Resulting respiration data were assimilated into a 3-pool model to derive decomposition kinetic parameters for fast, slow, and passive SOC pools. Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal taxa and microbial functional genes were profiled throughout the 3-year incubation. Correlation analyses and a Random Forest approach revealed associations between model parameters and microbial community profiles, taxa, and traits. There were more associations between the microbial community data and the SOC decomposition parameters of slow and passive SOC pools than those of the fast SOC pool. Also, microbial community profiles were better predictors of model parameters in deeper soils, which had higher mineral contents and relatively greater quantities of old SOC than in surface soils. Overall, our analyses revealed the functional potential of microbial communities to decompose tundra SOC through a suite of specializedmore » genes and taxa. In conclusion, these results portray divergent strategies by which microbial communities access SOC pools across varying depths, lending mechanistic insights into the vulnerability of what is considered stable SOC in tundra regions.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6];  [7]; ORCiD logo [8];  [9];  [10];  [11];  [12];  [10];  [7];  [13]
  1. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Environmental Genomics; US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), Parlier, CA (United States). San Joaquin Valley Agricultural Sciences Center
  2. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing (China). Inst. of Agricultural Resources and Regional Planning
  3. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Environmental Genomics; Central South Univ., Changsha, Hunan (China)
  4. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Environmental Genomics; Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). State Key Joint Lab. of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control
  5. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Environmental Genomics; Central South Univ., Changsha, Hunan (China)
  6. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)
  7. Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Center for Ecosystem Science and Society
  8. Arizona State Univ., Mesa, AZ (United States); Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States). Center for Fundamental and Applied Microbiomics, Biodesign Inst.
  9. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Environmental Genomics
  10. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Center for Microbial Ecology
  11. Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). School of Civil and Environmental Engineering and School of Biology
  12. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Center for Ecosystem Science and Society
  13. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Inst. for Environmental Genomics; Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China). State Key Joint Lab. of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control; Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1580991
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231; SC0004601; SC0010715; SC0006982; SC0014085
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The ISME Journal
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 1751-7362
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Hale, Lauren, Feng, Wenting, Yin, Huaqun, Guo, Xue, Zhou, Xishu, Bracho, Rosvel, Pegoraro, Elaine, Penton, C. Ryan, Wu, Liyou, Cole, James, Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., Luo, Yiqi, Tiedje, James M., Schuur, Edward. A. G., and Zhou, Jizhong. Tundra microbial community taxa and traits predict decomposition parameters of stable, old soil organic carbon. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41396-019-0485-x.
Hale, Lauren, Feng, Wenting, Yin, Huaqun, Guo, Xue, Zhou, Xishu, Bracho, Rosvel, Pegoraro, Elaine, Penton, C. Ryan, Wu, Liyou, Cole, James, Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., Luo, Yiqi, Tiedje, James M., Schuur, Edward. A. G., & Zhou, Jizhong. Tundra microbial community taxa and traits predict decomposition parameters of stable, old soil organic carbon. United States. doi:10.1038/s41396-019-0485-x.
Hale, Lauren, Feng, Wenting, Yin, Huaqun, Guo, Xue, Zhou, Xishu, Bracho, Rosvel, Pegoraro, Elaine, Penton, C. Ryan, Wu, Liyou, Cole, James, Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T., Luo, Yiqi, Tiedje, James M., Schuur, Edward. A. G., and Zhou, Jizhong. Mon . "Tundra microbial community taxa and traits predict decomposition parameters of stable, old soil organic carbon". United States. doi:10.1038/s41396-019-0485-x.
@article{osti_1580991,
title = {Tundra microbial community taxa and traits predict decomposition parameters of stable, old soil organic carbon},
author = {Hale, Lauren and Feng, Wenting and Yin, Huaqun and Guo, Xue and Zhou, Xishu and Bracho, Rosvel and Pegoraro, Elaine and Penton, C. Ryan and Wu, Liyou and Cole, James and Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T. and Luo, Yiqi and Tiedje, James M. and Schuur, Edward. A. G. and Zhou, Jizhong},
abstractNote = {The susceptibility of soil organic carbon (SOC) in tundra to microbial decomposition under warmer climate scenarios potentially threatens a massive positive feedback to climate change, but the underlying mechanisms of stable SOC decomposition remain elusive. Herein, Alaskan tundra soils from three depths (a fibric O horizon with litter and course roots, an O horizon with decomposing litter and roots, and a mineral-organic mix, laying just above the permafrost) were incubated. Resulting respiration data were assimilated into a 3-pool model to derive decomposition kinetic parameters for fast, slow, and passive SOC pools. Bacterial, archaeal, and fungal taxa and microbial functional genes were profiled throughout the 3-year incubation. Correlation analyses and a Random Forest approach revealed associations between model parameters and microbial community profiles, taxa, and traits. There were more associations between the microbial community data and the SOC decomposition parameters of slow and passive SOC pools than those of the fast SOC pool. Also, microbial community profiles were better predictors of model parameters in deeper soils, which had higher mineral contents and relatively greater quantities of old SOC than in surface soils. Overall, our analyses revealed the functional potential of microbial communities to decompose tundra SOC through a suite of specialized genes and taxa. In conclusion, these results portray divergent strategies by which microbial communities access SOC pools across varying depths, lending mechanistic insights into the vulnerability of what is considered stable SOC in tundra regions.},
doi = {10.1038/s41396-019-0485-x},
journal = {The ISME Journal},
number = 12,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}

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