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Title: Indoor versus Outdoor Air Quality during Wildfires

Abstract

The human behavioral modification recommendations during wildfire events are based on particulate matter and may be confounded by the potential risks of gas-phase pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Moreover, the majority of adults spend over 90 percent of their time indoors where there is an increased concern of indoor air quality during wildfire events. We address these timely concerns by evaluating paired indoor and outdoor PAH concentrations in residential locations and their relationship with satellite model-based categorization of wildfire smoke intensity. Low density polyethylene passive air samplers were deployed at six residential sites for one week in Eugene, Oregon with matched indoor and outdoor samples and twenty-four-hour time resolution. Samples were then quantitatively analyzed for 63 PAH concentrations using gas-chromatography. A probabilistic principal components analysis was used to reduce all 63 PAHs into an aggregate measure. Linear regression of the first principal component against indoor versus outdoor shows that indoor gas-phase PAH concentrations are consistently equal or greater than outdoor concentrations. Regression against a satellite-based model for wildfire smoke shows that outdoor, but not indoor gas-phase PAH concentrations are likely associated with wildfire events. Furthermore, these results point towards the need to include gas-phase pollutants such as PAHsmore » in air pollution risk assessment.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
  3. Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1577991
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-147722
Journal ID: ISSN 2328-8930
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC05-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Environmental Science & Technology Letters (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Environmental Science & Technology Letters (Online); Journal Volume: 6; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 2328-8930
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Wildfire Events; PAH concentrations; gas phase chemicals; biomimic; organic pollutants; anthropogenic warming; toxicity equivalency factor

Citation Formats

Messier, Kyle P., Tidwell, Lane G., Ghetu, Christine C., Rohlman, Diana, Scott, Richard P., Bramer, Lisa M., Dixon, Holly M., Waters, Katrina M., and Anderson, Kim A. Indoor versus Outdoor Air Quality during Wildfires. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.estlett.9b00599.
Messier, Kyle P., Tidwell, Lane G., Ghetu, Christine C., Rohlman, Diana, Scott, Richard P., Bramer, Lisa M., Dixon, Holly M., Waters, Katrina M., & Anderson, Kim A. Indoor versus Outdoor Air Quality during Wildfires. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.estlett.9b00599.
Messier, Kyle P., Tidwell, Lane G., Ghetu, Christine C., Rohlman, Diana, Scott, Richard P., Bramer, Lisa M., Dixon, Holly M., Waters, Katrina M., and Anderson, Kim A. Mon . "Indoor versus Outdoor Air Quality during Wildfires". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.estlett.9b00599.
@article{osti_1577991,
title = {Indoor versus Outdoor Air Quality during Wildfires},
author = {Messier, Kyle P. and Tidwell, Lane G. and Ghetu, Christine C. and Rohlman, Diana and Scott, Richard P. and Bramer, Lisa M. and Dixon, Holly M. and Waters, Katrina M. and Anderson, Kim A.},
abstractNote = {The human behavioral modification recommendations during wildfire events are based on particulate matter and may be confounded by the potential risks of gas-phase pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Moreover, the majority of adults spend over 90 percent of their time indoors where there is an increased concern of indoor air quality during wildfire events. We address these timely concerns by evaluating paired indoor and outdoor PAH concentrations in residential locations and their relationship with satellite model-based categorization of wildfire smoke intensity. Low density polyethylene passive air samplers were deployed at six residential sites for one week in Eugene, Oregon with matched indoor and outdoor samples and twenty-four-hour time resolution. Samples were then quantitatively analyzed for 63 PAH concentrations using gas-chromatography. A probabilistic principal components analysis was used to reduce all 63 PAHs into an aggregate measure. Linear regression of the first principal component against indoor versus outdoor shows that indoor gas-phase PAH concentrations are consistently equal or greater than outdoor concentrations. Regression against a satellite-based model for wildfire smoke shows that outdoor, but not indoor gas-phase PAH concentrations are likely associated with wildfire events. Furthermore, these results point towards the need to include gas-phase pollutants such as PAHs in air pollution risk assessment.},
doi = {10.1021/acs.estlett.9b00599},
journal = {Environmental Science & Technology Letters (Online)},
number = 12,
volume = 6,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

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This content will become publicly available on November 11, 2020
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