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Title: Engineering microscale systems for fully autonomous intracellular neural interfaces

Abstract

Conventional electrodes and associated positioning systems for intracellular recording from single neurons in vitro and in vivo are large and bulky, which has largely limited their scalability. Further, acquiring successful intracellular recordings is very tedious, requiring a high degree of skill not readily achieved in a typical laboratory. We report here a robotic, MEMS-based intracellular recording system to overcome the above limitations associated with form-factor, scalability and highly skilled and tedious manual operations required for intracellular recordings. This system combines three distinct technologies: 1) novel microscale, glass-polysilicon penetrating electrode for intracellular recording, 2) electrothermal microactuators for precise microscale movement of each electrode and 3) closed-loop control algorithm for autonomous positioning of electrode inside single neurons. Here, we demonstrate the novel, fully integrated system of glass-polysilicon microelectrode, microscale actuators and controller for autonomous intracellular recordings from single neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia Californica (n = 5 cells). Consistent resting potentials (< –35 mV) and action potentials (> 60 mV) were recorded after each successful penetration attempt with the controller and microactuated glass-polysilicon microelectrodes. The success rate of penetration and quality of intracellular recordings achieved using electrothermal microactuators were comparable to that of conventional positioning systems. The MEMS-based system offersmore » significant advantages: 1) reduction in overall size for potential use in behaving animals, 2) scalable approach to potentially realize multi-channel recordings and 3) a viable method to fully automate measurement of intracellular recordings. Furthermore, this system will be evaluated in vivo in future rodent studies.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3]
  1. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  2. mPower Technology, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)
  3. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1574800
Report Number(s):
SAND-2019-7498J
676990
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC04-94AL85000
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Microsystems and Nanoengineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Microsystems and Nanoengineering
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING

Citation Formats

Baker, Michael S., Okandan, Murat, Kumar, Swathy Sampath, and Muthuswamy, Jit. Engineering microscale systems for fully autonomous intracellular neural interfaces. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1101/689562.
Baker, Michael S., Okandan, Murat, Kumar, Swathy Sampath, & Muthuswamy, Jit. Engineering microscale systems for fully autonomous intracellular neural interfaces. United States. doi:10.1101/689562.
Baker, Michael S., Okandan, Murat, Kumar, Swathy Sampath, and Muthuswamy, Jit. Tue . "Engineering microscale systems for fully autonomous intracellular neural interfaces". United States. doi:10.1101/689562.
@article{osti_1574800,
title = {Engineering microscale systems for fully autonomous intracellular neural interfaces},
author = {Baker, Michael S. and Okandan, Murat and Kumar, Swathy Sampath and Muthuswamy, Jit},
abstractNote = {Conventional electrodes and associated positioning systems for intracellular recording from single neurons in vitro and in vivo are large and bulky, which has largely limited their scalability. Further, acquiring successful intracellular recordings is very tedious, requiring a high degree of skill not readily achieved in a typical laboratory. We report here a robotic, MEMS-based intracellular recording system to overcome the above limitations associated with form-factor, scalability and highly skilled and tedious manual operations required for intracellular recordings. This system combines three distinct technologies: 1) novel microscale, glass-polysilicon penetrating electrode for intracellular recording, 2) electrothermal microactuators for precise microscale movement of each electrode and 3) closed-loop control algorithm for autonomous positioning of electrode inside single neurons. Here, we demonstrate the novel, fully integrated system of glass-polysilicon microelectrode, microscale actuators and controller for autonomous intracellular recordings from single neurons in the abdominal ganglion of Aplysia Californica (n = 5 cells). Consistent resting potentials (< –35 mV) and action potentials (> 60 mV) were recorded after each successful penetration attempt with the controller and microactuated glass-polysilicon microelectrodes. The success rate of penetration and quality of intracellular recordings achieved using electrothermal microactuators were comparable to that of conventional positioning systems. The MEMS-based system offers significant advantages: 1) reduction in overall size for potential use in behaving animals, 2) scalable approach to potentially realize multi-channel recordings and 3) a viable method to fully automate measurement of intracellular recordings. Furthermore, this system will be evaluated in vivo in future rodent studies.},
doi = {10.1101/689562},
journal = {Microsystems and Nanoengineering},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {7}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

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