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Title: Stakeholders’ perceptions towards non-native acacias and implications for their management in Portugal

Abstract

Abstract Humans act as drivers for the introduction of non-native trees. Some non-native species may become invasive and cause undesirable impacts, thereby motivating targeted decision-making and management actions. Australian acacias (or wattles; genus Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae) have been introduced worldwide, offering both opportunities and risks for local communities. Understanding how stakeholders perceive invasive acacias is paramount to assist effective decision-making. We assessed stakeholders’ perceptions about these non-native acacias, their invasion process, social-ecological impacts and management. We conducted a questionnaire-based survey with experienced managers and decision-makers in Northern Portugal, where acacia invasions are widespread. We found that most stakeholders are not able to recognize non-native species, failing to identify the introduction period, drivers of dispersion and appropriate management methods of Australian acacias. We could also identify different stakeholder perceptions on the benefits and negative impacts provided by these species. We call for the implementation of technical training and information outreach strategies to address stakeholders’ lack of knowledge (and experience) on the recognition and identification of non-native trees, as well as on their introduction and invasion history, drivers of dispersion, costs and benefits, and effective management actions. Stakeholders’ engagement should be promoted in the design and implementation of biosecurity efforts to controlmore » (and/or adapt to) invasive acacias at relevant scales of invasion management.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. Departamento de Botanica, Universidad de Granada, Facultad de Ciencias, Campus Fuentenueva s/n, 18071, Granada, Spain, Laboratorio de Ecología (iEcolab), Instituto Interuniversitario de Investigación del Sistema Tierra en Andalucía (IISTA-CEAMA), Universidad de Granada, Avenida del Mediterráneo s/n, 18006, Granada, Spain, Research Network in Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (InBIO-CIBIO), Campus Agrário de Vairão, Rua Padre Armando Quintas, PT4485-661 Vairão, Portugal
  2. Research Network in Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (InBIO-CIBIO), Campus Agrário de Vairão, Rua Padre Armando Quintas, PT4485-661 Vairão, Portugal, Research Network in Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (InBIO-CIBIO), Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Universidade de Lisboa, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon, Portugal
  3. Research Network in Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (InBIO-CIBIO), Campus Agrário de Vairão, Rua Padre Armando Quintas, PT4485-661 Vairão, Portugal, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, s/n, PT4169-007 Porto, Portugal
  4. Research Network in Biodiversity and Evolutionary Biology, Research Centre in Biodiversity and Genetic Resources (InBIO-CIBIO), Campus Agrário de Vairão, Rua Padre Armando Quintas, PT4485-661 Vairão, Portugal
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Fuel Cycle Technologies (NE-5)
OSTI Identifier:
1574521
Grant/Contract Number:  
PTDC/AAG-GLO/0463/2014-POCI-01-0145-FEDER-016583; DL57/2016/ICETA/EEC2018/13
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Forestry
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Forestry; Journal ID: ISSN 0015-752X
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Vaz, Ana Sofia, Ribeiro, Joana, Honrado, João P., and Vicente, Joana R. Stakeholders’ perceptions towards non-native acacias and implications for their management in Portugal. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1093/forestry/cpz060.
Vaz, Ana Sofia, Ribeiro, Joana, Honrado, João P., & Vicente, Joana R. Stakeholders’ perceptions towards non-native acacias and implications for their management in Portugal. United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/forestry/cpz060.
Vaz, Ana Sofia, Ribeiro, Joana, Honrado, João P., and Vicente, Joana R. Mon . "Stakeholders’ perceptions towards non-native acacias and implications for their management in Portugal". United Kingdom. doi:10.1093/forestry/cpz060.
@article{osti_1574521,
title = {Stakeholders’ perceptions towards non-native acacias and implications for their management in Portugal},
author = {Vaz, Ana Sofia and Ribeiro, Joana and Honrado, João P. and Vicente, Joana R.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Humans act as drivers for the introduction of non-native trees. Some non-native species may become invasive and cause undesirable impacts, thereby motivating targeted decision-making and management actions. Australian acacias (or wattles; genus Acacia subgenus Phyllodineae) have been introduced worldwide, offering both opportunities and risks for local communities. Understanding how stakeholders perceive invasive acacias is paramount to assist effective decision-making. We assessed stakeholders’ perceptions about these non-native acacias, their invasion process, social-ecological impacts and management. We conducted a questionnaire-based survey with experienced managers and decision-makers in Northern Portugal, where acacia invasions are widespread. We found that most stakeholders are not able to recognize non-native species, failing to identify the introduction period, drivers of dispersion and appropriate management methods of Australian acacias. We could also identify different stakeholder perceptions on the benefits and negative impacts provided by these species. We call for the implementation of technical training and information outreach strategies to address stakeholders’ lack of knowledge (and experience) on the recognition and identification of non-native trees, as well as on their introduction and invasion history, drivers of dispersion, costs and benefits, and effective management actions. Stakeholders’ engagement should be promoted in the design and implementation of biosecurity efforts to control (and/or adapt to) invasive acacias at relevant scales of invasion management.},
doi = {10.1093/forestry/cpz060},
journal = {Forestry},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

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