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Title: Mechanical and optical response of polymethylpentene under dynamic compression

Abstract

Polymethylpentene, commonly referred to by its trade name TPX (Mitsui Chemicals, Inc.), is a thermoplastic polymer that has the potential to be a useful window material for dynamic compression experiments. For such experiments, an optically transparent or a low x-ray absorptive window is often used to maintain stress within the sample during compression. TPX can be used as a low-impedance optical and x-ray window due to its good transmittance in most parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, very low density (0.83 g/cm 3), and low x-ray absorption. In dynamic compression experiments, interferometry can be used to determine the particle velocity at the interface between the sample and window. However, velocimetry measures the rate of change of the optical path length, commonly referred to as the apparent particle velocity. An experimentally determined window correction factor is needed to ascertain the actual particle velocity from the measured apparent velocity. Here, we present the results of a series of dynamic compression experiments from 1 to 31 GPa designed to characterize the mechanical and optical response of TPX, determine the range of stresses over which TPX is transparent, and determine the window correction factor. Finally, the index of refraction was found to be essentially linearmore » in density, resulting in a simple constant correction factor. TPX was found to remain largely transparent over the entire stress range examined.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, and Inst. for Shock Physics
  2. Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. for Shock Physics; Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Washington State Univ., Pullman, WA (United States). Inst. for Shock Physics
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Programs (DP) (NA-10)
OSTI Identifier:
1574369
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1573520
Grant/Contract Number:  
NA0002007
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 126; Journal Issue: 18; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Barmore, Lauren M., and Knudson, M. D. Mechanical and optical response of polymethylpentene under dynamic compression. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5127867.
Barmore, Lauren M., & Knudson, M. D. Mechanical and optical response of polymethylpentene under dynamic compression. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5127867.
Barmore, Lauren M., and Knudson, M. D. Thu . "Mechanical and optical response of polymethylpentene under dynamic compression". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5127867.
@article{osti_1574369,
title = {Mechanical and optical response of polymethylpentene under dynamic compression},
author = {Barmore, Lauren M. and Knudson, M. D.},
abstractNote = {Polymethylpentene, commonly referred to by its trade name TPX (Mitsui Chemicals, Inc.), is a thermoplastic polymer that has the potential to be a useful window material for dynamic compression experiments. For such experiments, an optically transparent or a low x-ray absorptive window is often used to maintain stress within the sample during compression. TPX can be used as a low-impedance optical and x-ray window due to its good transmittance in most parts of the electromagnetic spectrum, very low density (0.83 g/cm3), and low x-ray absorption. In dynamic compression experiments, interferometry can be used to determine the particle velocity at the interface between the sample and window. However, velocimetry measures the rate of change of the optical path length, commonly referred to as the apparent particle velocity. An experimentally determined window correction factor is needed to ascertain the actual particle velocity from the measured apparent velocity. Here, we present the results of a series of dynamic compression experiments from 1 to 31 GPa designed to characterize the mechanical and optical response of TPX, determine the range of stresses over which TPX is transparent, and determine the window correction factor. Finally, the index of refraction was found to be essentially linear in density, resulting in a simple constant correction factor. TPX was found to remain largely transparent over the entire stress range examined.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5127867},
journal = {Journal of Applied Physics},
number = 18,
volume = 126,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {11}
}

Journal Article:
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