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Title: Microphysical and Dynamical Effects of Mixed-Phase Hydrometeors in Convective Storms Using a Bin Microphysics Model: Melting

Abstract

The dynamics of convective systems are inherently linked to microphysical processes through phase changes that result in warming or cooling. This is especially true of near-surface cooling via evaporation and melting of falling hydrometeors. In most numerical simulations, the melting of frozen hydrometeors (e.g., hail, graupel, snow) is computed within parameterized bulk microphysics schemes, many of which lack the ability to accurately represent mixed-phase hydrometeors (i.e., partially melted ice), which can affect hydrometeor sedimentation, melting, and evaporation of shed drops. To better understand the microphysical and dynamical effects of melting in convective storms, a bin microphysics scheme was used in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model for two idealized cases: a supercell storm and a squall line. Physically based predicted liquid fraction, instantaneous melting, and instantaneous shedding schemes were used to examine the role and importance of melting hydrometeors for these two storm modes. The results suggest that the amount of precipitation is dependent on the representation of melting. Moreover, the dynamic and thermodynamic characteristics of the simulated storms are found to differ substantially between the melting scenarios, resulting in varied storm system evolution; these differences are found to be dependent on the ambient aerosol concentration, although the differences inducedmore » by changing the representation of melting generally outweigh those of changing the aerosol loading. The results highlight the large role of melting in convective storm characteristics and suggest that further model improvements are needed in the near future.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Department of Atmospheric Science, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1574048
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0016354
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Monthly Weather Review
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Monthly Weather Review Journal Volume: 147 Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 0027-0644
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Kacan, Kevin G., and Lebo, Zachary J. Microphysical and Dynamical Effects of Mixed-Phase Hydrometeors in Convective Storms Using a Bin Microphysics Model: Melting. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1175/MWR-D-18-0032.1.
Kacan, Kevin G., & Lebo, Zachary J. Microphysical and Dynamical Effects of Mixed-Phase Hydrometeors in Convective Storms Using a Bin Microphysics Model: Melting. United States. doi:10.1175/MWR-D-18-0032.1.
Kacan, Kevin G., and Lebo, Zachary J. Sun . "Microphysical and Dynamical Effects of Mixed-Phase Hydrometeors in Convective Storms Using a Bin Microphysics Model: Melting". United States. doi:10.1175/MWR-D-18-0032.1.
@article{osti_1574048,
title = {Microphysical and Dynamical Effects of Mixed-Phase Hydrometeors in Convective Storms Using a Bin Microphysics Model: Melting},
author = {Kacan, Kevin G. and Lebo, Zachary J.},
abstractNote = {The dynamics of convective systems are inherently linked to microphysical processes through phase changes that result in warming or cooling. This is especially true of near-surface cooling via evaporation and melting of falling hydrometeors. In most numerical simulations, the melting of frozen hydrometeors (e.g., hail, graupel, snow) is computed within parameterized bulk microphysics schemes, many of which lack the ability to accurately represent mixed-phase hydrometeors (i.e., partially melted ice), which can affect hydrometeor sedimentation, melting, and evaporation of shed drops. To better understand the microphysical and dynamical effects of melting in convective storms, a bin microphysics scheme was used in the Weather Research and Forecasting Model for two idealized cases: a supercell storm and a squall line. Physically based predicted liquid fraction, instantaneous melting, and instantaneous shedding schemes were used to examine the role and importance of melting hydrometeors for these two storm modes. The results suggest that the amount of precipitation is dependent on the representation of melting. Moreover, the dynamic and thermodynamic characteristics of the simulated storms are found to differ substantially between the melting scenarios, resulting in varied storm system evolution; these differences are found to be dependent on the ambient aerosol concentration, although the differences induced by changing the representation of melting generally outweigh those of changing the aerosol loading. The results highlight the large role of melting in convective storm characteristics and suggest that further model improvements are needed in the near future.},
doi = {10.1175/MWR-D-18-0032.1},
journal = {Monthly Weather Review},
number = 12,
volume = 147,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {12}
}

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This content will become publicly available on November 12, 2020
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