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Title: Demographics, sleep, and daily patterns of caffeine intake of shift workers in a nationally representative sample of the US adult population

Abstract

Abstract Study Objective Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant in the world, and sociodemographic factors including occupation are associated with intake. Shift work, required in various occupations, is associated with poor sleep, inadequate diet, and adverse health effects. Using a large nationally representative database, demographics, sleep, and caffeine intake of US adults working various shifts were assessed. Methods The 24-hour dietary recall data from NHANES 2005–2010 (N = 8,500) were used to estimate caffeine intake from foods and beverages. Work shifts were self-reported as follows: regular day shift; evening shift; night shift; rotating shift; or other shift. Regression analyses assessed associations of shift work with caffeine intake after adjustment for sociodemographic factors. Results Approximately 74% of employed adults were day-shift workers and 26% were nonday-shift workers. Night-shift workers slept for 6.25 ± 0.09 hours per day, somewhat less than day-shift workers who only slept 6.83 ± 0.02 hours (p < .0001). Mean 24-hour weekday caffeine intake of evening-, night-, and rotating-shift workers (217 ± 23, 184 ± 19, and 206 ± 15 mg, respectively) was similar (p > .3) to day-shift workers (203 ± 5 mg). Regardless of work schedule, individuals consumed the most caffeine during morning hours. Evening-more » and night-shift workers reported consuming 36%–46% less caffeine during their work hours and 72%–169% more during nonwork hours than day-shift workers (p < .01). Conclusions Total daily caffeine intake of shift workers is similar to nonshift workers; most caffeine is consumed in the morning regardless of shift. Because shift workers consume less caffeine during regular work hours and more during nonwork hours than day workers, they may be using caffeine to, in part, optimize off-duty alertness.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Military Nutrition Division, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Natick, MA, USA
  2. Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Belcamp, MD, USA
  3. Henry M. Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD, USA
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1573260
Resource Type:
Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Sleep
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Sleep; Journal ID: ISSN 0161-8105
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Lieberman, Harris R., Agarwal, Sanjiv, Caldwell, John A., and Fulgoni, III, Victor L. Demographics, sleep, and daily patterns of caffeine intake of shift workers in a nationally representative sample of the US adult population. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1093/sleep/zsz240.
Lieberman, Harris R., Agarwal, Sanjiv, Caldwell, John A., & Fulgoni, III, Victor L. Demographics, sleep, and daily patterns of caffeine intake of shift workers in a nationally representative sample of the US adult population. United States. doi:10.1093/sleep/zsz240.
Lieberman, Harris R., Agarwal, Sanjiv, Caldwell, John A., and Fulgoni, III, Victor L. Sat . "Demographics, sleep, and daily patterns of caffeine intake of shift workers in a nationally representative sample of the US adult population". United States. doi:10.1093/sleep/zsz240.
@article{osti_1573260,
title = {Demographics, sleep, and daily patterns of caffeine intake of shift workers in a nationally representative sample of the US adult population},
author = {Lieberman, Harris R. and Agarwal, Sanjiv and Caldwell, John A. and Fulgoni, III, Victor L.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Study Objective Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulant in the world, and sociodemographic factors including occupation are associated with intake. Shift work, required in various occupations, is associated with poor sleep, inadequate diet, and adverse health effects. Using a large nationally representative database, demographics, sleep, and caffeine intake of US adults working various shifts were assessed. Methods The 24-hour dietary recall data from NHANES 2005–2010 (N = 8,500) were used to estimate caffeine intake from foods and beverages. Work shifts were self-reported as follows: regular day shift; evening shift; night shift; rotating shift; or other shift. Regression analyses assessed associations of shift work with caffeine intake after adjustment for sociodemographic factors. Results Approximately 74% of employed adults were day-shift workers and 26% were nonday-shift workers. Night-shift workers slept for 6.25 ± 0.09 hours per day, somewhat less than day-shift workers who only slept 6.83 ± 0.02 hours (p < .0001). Mean 24-hour weekday caffeine intake of evening-, night-, and rotating-shift workers (217 ± 23, 184 ± 19, and 206 ± 15 mg, respectively) was similar (p > .3) to day-shift workers (203 ± 5 mg). Regardless of work schedule, individuals consumed the most caffeine during morning hours. Evening- and night-shift workers reported consuming 36%–46% less caffeine during their work hours and 72%–169% more during nonwork hours than day-shift workers (p < .01). Conclusions Total daily caffeine intake of shift workers is similar to nonshift workers; most caffeine is consumed in the morning regardless of shift. Because shift workers consume less caffeine during regular work hours and more during nonwork hours than day workers, they may be using caffeine to, in part, optimize off-duty alertness.},
doi = {10.1093/sleep/zsz240},
journal = {Sleep},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1093/sleep/zsz240

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