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Title: Compressed glassy carbon maintaining graphite-like structure with linkage formation between graphene layers

Abstract

Amorphous diamond, formed by high-pressure compression of glassy carbon, is of interests for new carbon materials with unique properties such as high compressive strength. Previous studies attributed the ultrahigh strength of the compressed glassy carbon to structural transformation from graphite-like sp 2-bonded structure to diamond-like sp 3-bonded structure. However, there is no direct experimental determination of the bond structure of the compressed glassy carbon, because of experimental challenges. Here we succeeded to experimentally determine pair distribution functions of a glassy carbon at ultrahigh pressures up to 49.0 GPa by utilizing our recently developed double-stage large volume cell. Our results show that the C-C-C bond angle in the glassy carbon remains close to 120°, which is the ideal angle for the sp 2-bonded honey-comb structure, up to 49.0 GPa. Our data clearly indicate that the glassy carbon maintains graphite-like structure up to 49.0 GPa. In contrast, graphene interlayer distance decreases sharply with increasing pressure, approaching values of the second neighbor C-C distance above 31.4 GPa. Linkages between the graphene layers may be formed with such a short distance, but not in the form of tetrahedral sp 3 bond. The unique structure of the compressed glassy carbon may be the key tomore » the ultrahigh strength.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan); National Inst. for Materials Science, Ibaraki (Japan)
  2. Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States); Ehime Univ., Ehime (Japan)
  3. Carnegie Inst. of Washington, Argonne, IL (United States); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Scientific User Facilities Division; Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), KAKENHI; National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1572681
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES

Citation Formats

Shibazaki, Yuki, Kono, Yoshio, and Shen, Guoyin. Compressed glassy carbon maintaining graphite-like structure with linkage formation between graphene layers. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43954-5.
Shibazaki, Yuki, Kono, Yoshio, & Shen, Guoyin. Compressed glassy carbon maintaining graphite-like structure with linkage formation between graphene layers. United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43954-5.
Shibazaki, Yuki, Kono, Yoshio, and Shen, Guoyin. Fri . "Compressed glassy carbon maintaining graphite-like structure with linkage formation between graphene layers". United States. doi:10.1038/s41598-019-43954-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1572681.
@article{osti_1572681,
title = {Compressed glassy carbon maintaining graphite-like structure with linkage formation between graphene layers},
author = {Shibazaki, Yuki and Kono, Yoshio and Shen, Guoyin},
abstractNote = {Amorphous diamond, formed by high-pressure compression of glassy carbon, is of interests for new carbon materials with unique properties such as high compressive strength. Previous studies attributed the ultrahigh strength of the compressed glassy carbon to structural transformation from graphite-like sp2-bonded structure to diamond-like sp3-bonded structure. However, there is no direct experimental determination of the bond structure of the compressed glassy carbon, because of experimental challenges. Here we succeeded to experimentally determine pair distribution functions of a glassy carbon at ultrahigh pressures up to 49.0 GPa by utilizing our recently developed double-stage large volume cell. Our results show that the C-C-C bond angle in the glassy carbon remains close to 120°, which is the ideal angle for the sp2-bonded honey-comb structure, up to 49.0 GPa. Our data clearly indicate that the glassy carbon maintains graphite-like structure up to 49.0 GPa. In contrast, graphene interlayer distance decreases sharply with increasing pressure, approaching values of the second neighbor C-C distance above 31.4 GPa. Linkages between the graphene layers may be formed with such a short distance, but not in the form of tetrahedral sp3 bond. The unique structure of the compressed glassy carbon may be the key to the ultrahigh strength.},
doi = {10.1038/s41598-019-43954-5},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = 1,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

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