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Title: Mitigating CO 2 emissions of concrete manufacturing through CO 2 -enabled binder reduction

Abstract

Abstract Past studies on CO 2 utilization in the concrete industry have primarily focused on maximizing sequestered CO 2 , while focusing less on CO 2 avoidance possible by reducing binder use through the addition of CO 2 to concrete formulations. In this paper, we study the net CO 2 reduction and cost benefits achievable by reducing binder loading while adding CO 2 via three approaches: carbonation during curing, carbonation during mixing, or carbonation with recycled concrete aggregate. These techniques are evaluated for a cohort of concrete formulations representing the diverse mixture designs found in the US ready-mixed and precast industries. Each formulation is optimized for reduced binder loading where the use of CO 2 directly in the formulation recovers the lost compressive strength from reduced binder. We show that over an order of magnitude more CO 2 can be avoided when binder reduction is jointly implemented with CO 2 utilization compared to utilizing CO 2 alone. As a result, nearly 40% of the annual CO 2 emissions from the US concrete industry could, in principle, be eliminated without relying on novel supplemental materials, alternative binder, or carbon capture and sequestration. The recently amended 45Q tax credit will not incentivizemore » this strategy, as it only considers carbon sequestration. However, we find that the saved material cost from reduced binder use on its own may provide a significant economic incentive to promote the joint strategy in practice. We conclude that the real value of CO 2 utilization in concrete hinges on exploiting CO 2 -induced property changes to yield additional emission reduction, not by maximizing absorbed CO 2 .« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
OSTI Identifier:
1572209
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1799913
Grant/Contract Number:  
FE0030684
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Environmental Research Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Environmental Research Letters Journal Volume: 14 Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-9326
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Meteorology & Atmospheric Sciences

Citation Formats

Lim, Tae, Ellis, Brian R., and Skerlos, Steven J. Mitigating CO 2 emissions of concrete manufacturing through CO 2 -enabled binder reduction. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1088/1748-9326/ab466e.
Lim, Tae, Ellis, Brian R., & Skerlos, Steven J. Mitigating CO 2 emissions of concrete manufacturing through CO 2 -enabled binder reduction. United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab466e
Lim, Tae, Ellis, Brian R., and Skerlos, Steven J. Tue . "Mitigating CO 2 emissions of concrete manufacturing through CO 2 -enabled binder reduction". United Kingdom. https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab466e.
@article{osti_1572209,
title = {Mitigating CO 2 emissions of concrete manufacturing through CO 2 -enabled binder reduction},
author = {Lim, Tae and Ellis, Brian R. and Skerlos, Steven J.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Past studies on CO 2 utilization in the concrete industry have primarily focused on maximizing sequestered CO 2 , while focusing less on CO 2 avoidance possible by reducing binder use through the addition of CO 2 to concrete formulations. In this paper, we study the net CO 2 reduction and cost benefits achievable by reducing binder loading while adding CO 2 via three approaches: carbonation during curing, carbonation during mixing, or carbonation with recycled concrete aggregate. These techniques are evaluated for a cohort of concrete formulations representing the diverse mixture designs found in the US ready-mixed and precast industries. Each formulation is optimized for reduced binder loading where the use of CO 2 directly in the formulation recovers the lost compressive strength from reduced binder. We show that over an order of magnitude more CO 2 can be avoided when binder reduction is jointly implemented with CO 2 utilization compared to utilizing CO 2 alone. As a result, nearly 40% of the annual CO 2 emissions from the US concrete industry could, in principle, be eliminated without relying on novel supplemental materials, alternative binder, or carbon capture and sequestration. The recently amended 45Q tax credit will not incentivize this strategy, as it only considers carbon sequestration. However, we find that the saved material cost from reduced binder use on its own may provide a significant economic incentive to promote the joint strategy in practice. We conclude that the real value of CO 2 utilization in concrete hinges on exploiting CO 2 -induced property changes to yield additional emission reduction, not by maximizing absorbed CO 2 .},
doi = {10.1088/1748-9326/ab466e},
journal = {Environmental Research Letters},
number = 11,
volume = 14,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/ab466e

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