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Title: Cloud Influence on ERA5 and AMPS Surface Downwelling Longwave Radiation Biases in West Antarctica

Abstract

Abstract The surface downwelling longwave radiation component (LW↓) is crucial for the determination of the surface energy budget and has significant implications for the resilience of ice surfaces in the polar regions. Accurate model evaluation of this radiation component requires knowledge about the phase, vertical distribution, and associated temperature of water in the atmosphere, all of which control the LW↓ signal measured at the surface. In this study, we examine the LW↓ model errors found in the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) operational forecast model and the ERA5 model relative to observations from the ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) campaign at McMurdo Station and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide. The errors are calculated separately for observed clear-sky conditions, ice-cloud occurrences, and liquid-bearing cloud-layer (LBCL) occurrences. The analysis results show a tendency in both models at each site to underestimate the LW↓ during clear-sky conditions, high error variability (standard deviations > 20 W m−2) during any type of cloud occurrence, and negative LW↓ biases when LBCLs are observed (bias magnitudes >15 W m−2 in tenuous LBCL cases and >43 W m−2 in optically thick/opaque LBCLs instances). We suggest that a generally dry and liquid-deficient atmosphere responsible for themore » identified LW↓ biases in both models is the result of excessive ice formation and growth, which could stem from the model initial and lateral boundary conditions, microphysics scheme, aerosol representation, and/or limited vertical resolution.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7]
  1. Department of Meteorology and Atmospheric Science, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania
  2. Polar Meteorology Group, Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  3. Polar Meteorology Group, Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, Atmospheric Sciences Program, Department of Geography, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
  4. NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, New York
  5. Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois
  6. Space Science and Engineering Center, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin
  7. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Science Foundation (NSF); National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA)
OSTI Identifier:
1572106
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1607640
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0017981; AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Climate
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Climate Journal Volume: 32 Journal Issue: 22; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-8755
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Antarctica; Cloud radiative effects; Cloud water; phase; Longwave radiation; Water vapor; Model errors

Citation Formats

Silber, Israel, Verlinde, Johannes, Wang, Sheng-Hung, Bromwich, David H., Fridlind, Ann M., Cadeddu, Maria, Eloranta, Edwin W., and Flynn, Connor J. Cloud Influence on ERA5 and AMPS Surface Downwelling Longwave Radiation Biases in West Antarctica. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0149.1.
Silber, Israel, Verlinde, Johannes, Wang, Sheng-Hung, Bromwich, David H., Fridlind, Ann M., Cadeddu, Maria, Eloranta, Edwin W., & Flynn, Connor J. Cloud Influence on ERA5 and AMPS Surface Downwelling Longwave Radiation Biases in West Antarctica. United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0149.1
Silber, Israel, Verlinde, Johannes, Wang, Sheng-Hung, Bromwich, David H., Fridlind, Ann M., Cadeddu, Maria, Eloranta, Edwin W., and Flynn, Connor J. Fri . "Cloud Influence on ERA5 and AMPS Surface Downwelling Longwave Radiation Biases in West Antarctica". United States. doi:https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0149.1.
@article{osti_1572106,
title = {Cloud Influence on ERA5 and AMPS Surface Downwelling Longwave Radiation Biases in West Antarctica},
author = {Silber, Israel and Verlinde, Johannes and Wang, Sheng-Hung and Bromwich, David H. and Fridlind, Ann M. and Cadeddu, Maria and Eloranta, Edwin W. and Flynn, Connor J.},
abstractNote = {Abstract The surface downwelling longwave radiation component (LW↓) is crucial for the determination of the surface energy budget and has significant implications for the resilience of ice surfaces in the polar regions. Accurate model evaluation of this radiation component requires knowledge about the phase, vertical distribution, and associated temperature of water in the atmosphere, all of which control the LW↓ signal measured at the surface. In this study, we examine the LW↓ model errors found in the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) operational forecast model and the ERA5 model relative to observations from the ARM West Antarctic Radiation Experiment (AWARE) campaign at McMurdo Station and the West Antarctic Ice Sheet (WAIS) Divide. The errors are calculated separately for observed clear-sky conditions, ice-cloud occurrences, and liquid-bearing cloud-layer (LBCL) occurrences. The analysis results show a tendency in both models at each site to underestimate the LW↓ during clear-sky conditions, high error variability (standard deviations > 20 W m−2) during any type of cloud occurrence, and negative LW↓ biases when LBCLs are observed (bias magnitudes >15 W m−2 in tenuous LBCL cases and >43 W m−2 in optically thick/opaque LBCLs instances). We suggest that a generally dry and liquid-deficient atmosphere responsible for the identified LW↓ biases in both models is the result of excessive ice formation and growth, which could stem from the model initial and lateral boundary conditions, microphysics scheme, aerosol representation, and/or limited vertical resolution.},
doi = {10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0149.1},
journal = {Journal of Climate},
number = 22,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-19-0149.1

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3 works
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Figures / Tables:

Table 1 Table 1: AMPS and ERA5 surface downwelling longwave radiation ($LW$↓) model-error statistics during different atmospheric regimes at McMurdo Station and the WAIS Divide (LBCL stands for liquid-bearing cloud layer). The Pearson’s correlation coefficient ($r$) is calculated for the raw data at both sites, as well as for the residual datamore » (at McMurdo), after the removal of the annual cycle using a non-linear least-square sine fit.« less

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Works referencing / citing this record:

Persistent Supercooled Drizzle at Temperatures Below −25 °C Observed at McMurdo Station, Antarctica
journal, October 2019

  • Silber, Israel; Fridlind, Ann M.; Verlinde, Johannes
  • Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, Vol. 124, Issue 20
  • DOI: 10.1029/2019jd030882

    Figures/Tables have been extracted from DOE-funded journal article accepted manuscripts.