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Title: Scaling‐Up of Nano‐Architected Microstructures: A Mechanical Assessment

Abstract

Nano– and micro–architected materials generated by ultra–high–resolution 3D printing techniques, such as two–photon polymerization direct laser writing (TPP–DLW) or projection micro–stereolithography (PμSL), have garnered great interest due to their ability to achieve exceptional combinations of material properties. The scalability of these materials, however, remains a crucial challenge as larger high–resolution samples require stitching smaller blocks of the structure of interest together. Herein, scaling techniques and testing methodologies to investigate the effect of stitching on the integrity and mechanical behavior of TPP–DLW parts under tensile load are explored. Specifically, stitched log–pile I–beam specimens with relative densities of 21.5% and 54.7% are tested herein. The micro–tensile tests reveal that the higher–density log–pile samples exhibit brittle behavior with fracture loads at least four times higher than those of lower–density samples. The location of sample failure depends on the type of stitch introduced in the sample, as well as on the relative sample density. Altogether, this study highlights the importance of stitching techniques and relative density for the design of nano– and micro–architected materials.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1571743
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1561331
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-776826
Journal ID: ISSN 1438-1656; 969906
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Advanced Engineering Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Advanced Engineering Materials; Journal ID: ISSN 1438-1656
Publisher:
Wiley
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; architected materials; direct laser writing; mechanical behavior; scaling-up; two-photon polymerization

Citation Formats

Garcia-Taormina, Alina R., Juarez, Theresa, Oakdale, James S., Biener, Juergen, and Hodge, Andrea M. Scaling‐Up of Nano‐Architected Microstructures: A Mechanical Assessment. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1002/adem.201900687.
Garcia-Taormina, Alina R., Juarez, Theresa, Oakdale, James S., Biener, Juergen, & Hodge, Andrea M. Scaling‐Up of Nano‐Architected Microstructures: A Mechanical Assessment. United States. doi:10.1002/adem.201900687.
Garcia-Taormina, Alina R., Juarez, Theresa, Oakdale, James S., Biener, Juergen, and Hodge, Andrea M. Thu . "Scaling‐Up of Nano‐Architected Microstructures: A Mechanical Assessment". United States. doi:10.1002/adem.201900687.
@article{osti_1571743,
title = {Scaling‐Up of Nano‐Architected Microstructures: A Mechanical Assessment},
author = {Garcia-Taormina, Alina R. and Juarez, Theresa and Oakdale, James S. and Biener, Juergen and Hodge, Andrea M.},
abstractNote = {Nano– and micro–architected materials generated by ultra–high–resolution 3D printing techniques, such as two–photon polymerization direct laser writing (TPP–DLW) or projection micro–stereolithography (PμSL), have garnered great interest due to their ability to achieve exceptional combinations of material properties. The scalability of these materials, however, remains a crucial challenge as larger high–resolution samples require stitching smaller blocks of the structure of interest together. Herein, scaling techniques and testing methodologies to investigate the effect of stitching on the integrity and mechanical behavior of TPP–DLW parts under tensile load are explored. Specifically, stitched log–pile I–beam specimens with relative densities of 21.5% and 54.7% are tested herein. The micro–tensile tests reveal that the higher–density log–pile samples exhibit brittle behavior with fracture loads at least four times higher than those of lower–density samples. The location of sample failure depends on the type of stitch introduced in the sample, as well as on the relative sample density. Altogether, this study highlights the importance of stitching techniques and relative density for the design of nano– and micro–architected materials.},
doi = {10.1002/adem.201900687},
journal = {Advanced Engineering Materials},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {8}
}

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Works referenced in this record:

Finer features for functional microdevices
journal, August 2001

  • Kawata, Satoshi; Sun, Hong-Bo; Tanaka, Tomokazu
  • Nature, Vol. 412, Issue 6848, p. 697-698
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Three-Dimensional Invisibility Cloak at Optical Wavelengths
journal, March 2010