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Title: Paleodust Insights into Dust Impacts on Climate

Abstract

Abstract Mineral dust acts both as a tracer and a forcing agent of climate change. Past dust variability, imprinted in paleodust records from natural archives, offers the unique opportunity to reconstruct the global dust cycle within a range of possibilities that plausibly encompass future variations in response to climate change and land-cover and land-use changes. Dust itself has direct and indirect feedbacks on the climate system, through impacts on the atmosphere radiative budget and the carbon cycle. Starting from well-constrained reconstructions of the present and past dust cycle, we focus on quantifying dust direct impacts on the atmospheric radiation. We discuss the intrinsic effects of dust onto climate, and how changes in the global dust budget and surface conditions modulate the effective impacts on surface temperatures and precipitation. Most notably, the presence of dust tends to enhance the West African monsoon and warm the Arctic. We also highlight how different choices in terms of dust optical properties and size distributions may yield opposite results, and what are the observational constraints we can use to make an informed choice of model parameters. Finally, we discuss how dust variability might have influenced ongoing climate transitions in the past. In particular we foundmore » that a reduction in dust load, along with a reduced cryosphere cover, acted to offset Arctic warming during the deglaciation, potentially playing a role in shaping the Northern Hemisphere deglacial dynamics.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2]
  1. Department of Environmental and Earth Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Milano, Italy
  2. Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1571699
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC00006735
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Climate
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Journal of Climate Journal Volume: 32 Journal Issue: 22; Journal ID: ISSN 0894-8755
Publisher:
American Meteorological Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Albani, Samuel, and Mahowald, Natalie M. Paleodust Insights into Dust Impacts on Climate. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0742.1.
Albani, Samuel, & Mahowald, Natalie M. Paleodust Insights into Dust Impacts on Climate. United States. https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0742.1
Albani, Samuel, and Mahowald, Natalie M. Thu . "Paleodust Insights into Dust Impacts on Climate". United States. https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0742.1.
@article{osti_1571699,
title = {Paleodust Insights into Dust Impacts on Climate},
author = {Albani, Samuel and Mahowald, Natalie M.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Mineral dust acts both as a tracer and a forcing agent of climate change. Past dust variability, imprinted in paleodust records from natural archives, offers the unique opportunity to reconstruct the global dust cycle within a range of possibilities that plausibly encompass future variations in response to climate change and land-cover and land-use changes. Dust itself has direct and indirect feedbacks on the climate system, through impacts on the atmosphere radiative budget and the carbon cycle. Starting from well-constrained reconstructions of the present and past dust cycle, we focus on quantifying dust direct impacts on the atmospheric radiation. We discuss the intrinsic effects of dust onto climate, and how changes in the global dust budget and surface conditions modulate the effective impacts on surface temperatures and precipitation. Most notably, the presence of dust tends to enhance the West African monsoon and warm the Arctic. We also highlight how different choices in terms of dust optical properties and size distributions may yield opposite results, and what are the observational constraints we can use to make an informed choice of model parameters. Finally, we discuss how dust variability might have influenced ongoing climate transitions in the past. In particular we found that a reduction in dust load, along with a reduced cryosphere cover, acted to offset Arctic warming during the deglaciation, potentially playing a role in shaping the Northern Hemisphere deglacial dynamics.},
doi = {10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0742.1},
journal = {Journal of Climate},
number = 22,
volume = 32,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
https://doi.org/10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0742.1

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3 works
Citation information provided by
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