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Title: Identification of interstratified mica and pyrophyllite monolayers within chlorite using advanced scanning/transmission electron microscopy

Abstract

Interstratified clay minerals reflect the weathering degree and record climatic conditions and the pedogenic processes in the soil. It is hard to distinguish a few layers of interstratified clay minerals from the chlorite matrix, due to their similar two-dimensional tetrahedral-octahedral-tetrahedral (TOT) structure and electron-beam sensitive nature during transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. In this study, we used multiple advanced TEM techniques including low-dose high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) mapping to study interstratified layers in a chlorite sample from Changping, Beijing, China. We demonstrated an interstratified mica or pyrophyllite monolayer could be well distinguished from the chlorite matrix by projected atomic structures, lattice spacings, and chemical compositions with advanced TEM techniques. Further investigation showed two different transformation mechanisms from mica or pyrophyllite to chlorite: either a 4 A increase or decrease in the lattice spacing. Lastly, this characterization approach can be extended to the studies of other electron-beam sensitive minerals.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Peking Univ., Beijing (China); Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
  2. Peking Univ., Beijing (China)
  3. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Lemont, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; National Natural Science Foundation of China (NNSFC); China Scholarship Council
OSTI Identifier:
1571642
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
American Mineralogist
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 104; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 0003-004X
Publisher:
Mineralogical Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; interstratified layer; Chlorite; HRTEM; STEM

Citation Formats

Wang, Guanyu, Wang, Hejing, and Wen, Jianguo. Identification of interstratified mica and pyrophyllite monolayers within chlorite using advanced scanning/transmission electron microscopy. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.2138/am-2019-7074.
Wang, Guanyu, Wang, Hejing, & Wen, Jianguo. Identification of interstratified mica and pyrophyllite monolayers within chlorite using advanced scanning/transmission electron microscopy. United States. doi:10.2138/am-2019-7074.
Wang, Guanyu, Wang, Hejing, and Wen, Jianguo. Tue . "Identification of interstratified mica and pyrophyllite monolayers within chlorite using advanced scanning/transmission electron microscopy". United States. doi:10.2138/am-2019-7074.
@article{osti_1571642,
title = {Identification of interstratified mica and pyrophyllite monolayers within chlorite using advanced scanning/transmission electron microscopy},
author = {Wang, Guanyu and Wang, Hejing and Wen, Jianguo},
abstractNote = {Interstratified clay minerals reflect the weathering degree and record climatic conditions and the pedogenic processes in the soil. It is hard to distinguish a few layers of interstratified clay minerals from the chlorite matrix, due to their similar two-dimensional tetrahedral-octahedral-tetrahedral (TOT) structure and electron-beam sensitive nature during transmission electron microscopy (TEM) imaging. In this study, we used multiple advanced TEM techniques including low-dose high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM) imaging combined with energy-dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) mapping to study interstratified layers in a chlorite sample from Changping, Beijing, China. We demonstrated an interstratified mica or pyrophyllite monolayer could be well distinguished from the chlorite matrix by projected atomic structures, lattice spacings, and chemical compositions with advanced TEM techniques. Further investigation showed two different transformation mechanisms from mica or pyrophyllite to chlorite: either a 4 A increase or decrease in the lattice spacing. Lastly, this characterization approach can be extended to the studies of other electron-beam sensitive minerals.},
doi = {10.2138/am-2019-7074},
journal = {American Mineralogist},
number = 10,
volume = 104,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {10}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on October 1, 2020
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