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Title: Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Alterations in the Glycine N-Methyltransferase Gene in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-Associated Carcinogenesis

Abstract

Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a major etiological risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States and other Western countries. In this study, we investigated the role of gene-specific promoter cytosine DNA methylation and gene expression alterations in the development of NAFLD-associated HCC in mice using (1) a diet-induced animal model of NAFLD, (2) a Stelic Animal Model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-derived HCC, and (3) a choline- and folate-deficient (CFD) diet (CFD model). We found that the development of NAFLD and its progression to HCC was characterized by down-regulation of glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt) and this was mediated by progressive Gnmt promoter cytosine DNA hypermethylation. Using a panel of genetically diverse inbred mice, we observed that Gnmt down-regulation was an early event in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and correlated with the extent of the NAFLD-like liver injury. Reduced GNMT expression was also found in human HCC tissue and liver cancer cell lines. In in vitro experiments, we demonstrated that one of the consequences of GNMT inhibition was an increase in genome methylation facilitated by an elevated level of S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Overall, our findings suggest that reduced Gnmt expression caused by promoter hypermethylation is one of the key molecularmore » events in the development of NAFLD-derived HCC and that assessing Gnmt methylation level may be useful for disease stratification.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [5];  [1];  [4];  [1]
  1. Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, Arkansas 72079
  2. Division of Biochemical Toxicology, National Center for Toxicological Research, Jefferson, Arkansas 72079, State University of New York at Geneseo, Geneseo, New York 14454
  3. Core Metabolomics Laboratory, Arkansas Children’s Research Institute, Little Rock, Arkansas 72202
  4. Department of Internal Medicine, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia 23298
  5. Department of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas 77843
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1565976
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1525913
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Toxicological Sciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Toxicological Sciences Journal Volume: 170 Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1096-6080
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Borowa-Mazgaj, Barbara, de Conti, Aline, Tryndyak, Volodymyr, Steward, Colleen R., Jimenez, Leandro, Melnyk, Stepan, Seneshaw, Mulugeta, Mirshahi, Faridodin, Rusyn, Ivan, Beland, Frederick A., Sanyal, Arun J., and Pogribny, Igor P. Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Alterations in the Glycine N-Methyltransferase Gene in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-Associated Carcinogenesis. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfz110.
Borowa-Mazgaj, Barbara, de Conti, Aline, Tryndyak, Volodymyr, Steward, Colleen R., Jimenez, Leandro, Melnyk, Stepan, Seneshaw, Mulugeta, Mirshahi, Faridodin, Rusyn, Ivan, Beland, Frederick A., Sanyal, Arun J., & Pogribny, Igor P. Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Alterations in the Glycine N-Methyltransferase Gene in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-Associated Carcinogenesis. United States. doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfz110.
Borowa-Mazgaj, Barbara, de Conti, Aline, Tryndyak, Volodymyr, Steward, Colleen R., Jimenez, Leandro, Melnyk, Stepan, Seneshaw, Mulugeta, Mirshahi, Faridodin, Rusyn, Ivan, Beland, Frederick A., Sanyal, Arun J., and Pogribny, Igor P. Tue . "Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Alterations in the Glycine N-Methyltransferase Gene in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-Associated Carcinogenesis". United States. doi:10.1093/toxsci/kfz110.
@article{osti_1565976,
title = {Gene Expression and DNA Methylation Alterations in the Glycine N-Methyltransferase Gene in Diet-Induced Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease-Associated Carcinogenesis},
author = {Borowa-Mazgaj, Barbara and de Conti, Aline and Tryndyak, Volodymyr and Steward, Colleen R. and Jimenez, Leandro and Melnyk, Stepan and Seneshaw, Mulugeta and Mirshahi, Faridodin and Rusyn, Ivan and Beland, Frederick A. and Sanyal, Arun J. and Pogribny, Igor P.},
abstractNote = {Abstract Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is becoming a major etiological risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in the United States and other Western countries. In this study, we investigated the role of gene-specific promoter cytosine DNA methylation and gene expression alterations in the development of NAFLD-associated HCC in mice using (1) a diet-induced animal model of NAFLD, (2) a Stelic Animal Model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis-derived HCC, and (3) a choline- and folate-deficient (CFD) diet (CFD model). We found that the development of NAFLD and its progression to HCC was characterized by down-regulation of glycine N-methyltransferase (Gnmt) and this was mediated by progressive Gnmt promoter cytosine DNA hypermethylation. Using a panel of genetically diverse inbred mice, we observed that Gnmt down-regulation was an early event in the pathogenesis of NAFLD and correlated with the extent of the NAFLD-like liver injury. Reduced GNMT expression was also found in human HCC tissue and liver cancer cell lines. In in vitro experiments, we demonstrated that one of the consequences of GNMT inhibition was an increase in genome methylation facilitated by an elevated level of S-adenosyl-L-methionine. Overall, our findings suggest that reduced Gnmt expression caused by promoter hypermethylation is one of the key molecular events in the development of NAFLD-derived HCC and that assessing Gnmt methylation level may be useful for disease stratification.},
doi = {10.1093/toxsci/kfz110},
journal = {Toxicological Sciences},
number = 2,
volume = 170,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {5}
}

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