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Title: “Prophetic vision, vivid imagination”: The 1927 Mississippi River flood: THE 1927 MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD

Abstract

The 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River was the most destructive flood in American his-tory, inundating more than 70,000 km2of land, resulting in approximately 500 fatalities and leaving morethan 700,000 people homeless. Despite the prominence of the 1927 flood, details on the flood, and thestorms that produced the flood, are sparse. We examine the hydrometeorology and hydroclimatology ofthe 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River through downscaling simulations of the storms that wereresponsible for catastrophic flooding and through empirical analyses of rainfall and streamflow records. Weuse Twentieth Century Reanalysis fields as boundary conditions and initial conditions for downscaling simu-lations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We place the hydrometeorological analy-ses of the 1927 storms in a hydroclimatological context through analyses of the Twentieth CenturyReanalysis fields. Analyses are designed to assess the physical processes that control the upper tail of flood-ing in the Lower Mississippi River. We compare the 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River to floods in1937 and 2011 that represent the most extreme flooding in the Lower Mississippi River.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1565405
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Water Resources Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 51; Journal Issue: 12; Journal ID: ISSN 0043-1397
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union (AGU)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; Environmental Sciences & Ecology; Marine & Freshwater Biology; Water Resources

Citation Formats

Smith, James A., and Baeck, Mary Lynn. “Prophetic vision, vivid imagination”: The 1927 Mississippi River flood: THE 1927 MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD. United States: N. p., 2015. Web. doi:10.1002/2015wr017927.
Smith, James A., & Baeck, Mary Lynn. “Prophetic vision, vivid imagination”: The 1927 Mississippi River flood: THE 1927 MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD. United States. doi:10.1002/2015wr017927.
Smith, James A., and Baeck, Mary Lynn. Mon . "“Prophetic vision, vivid imagination”: The 1927 Mississippi River flood: THE 1927 MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD". United States. doi:10.1002/2015wr017927. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1565405.
@article{osti_1565405,
title = {“Prophetic vision, vivid imagination”: The 1927 Mississippi River flood: THE 1927 MISSISSIPPI RIVER FLOOD},
author = {Smith, James A. and Baeck, Mary Lynn},
abstractNote = {The 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River was the most destructive flood in American his-tory, inundating more than 70,000 km2of land, resulting in approximately 500 fatalities and leaving morethan 700,000 people homeless. Despite the prominence of the 1927 flood, details on the flood, and thestorms that produced the flood, are sparse. We examine the hydrometeorology and hydroclimatology ofthe 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River through downscaling simulations of the storms that wereresponsible for catastrophic flooding and through empirical analyses of rainfall and streamflow records. Weuse Twentieth Century Reanalysis fields as boundary conditions and initial conditions for downscaling simu-lations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We place the hydrometeorological analy-ses of the 1927 storms in a hydroclimatological context through analyses of the Twentieth CenturyReanalysis fields. Analyses are designed to assess the physical processes that control the upper tail of flood-ing in the Lower Mississippi River. We compare the 1927 flood in the Lower Mississippi River to floods in1937 and 2011 that represent the most extreme flooding in the Lower Mississippi River.},
doi = {10.1002/2015wr017927},
journal = {Water Resources Research},
number = 12,
volume = 51,
place = {United States},
year = {2015},
month = {11}
}

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Cited by: 10 works
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Figures / Tables:

Figure 1 Figure 1: Mississippi River map, showing locations of major tributary rivers, stream gaging stations, and the locations of two major crevasses during the 1927 flood. The location of the White River stream gaging station is shown by the red circle labeled 1. The Petit Jean gaging station is shown bymore » the red circle labeled 2. Green dots indicate locations of stream gaging stations referenced in the text.« less

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