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Title: Response of Tropical Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to the Super El Niño Event in 2015

Abstract

The gross primary production (GPP) in tropical terrestrial ecosystems plays a critical role in the global carbon cycle and climate change. The strong 2015–2016 El Niño event offers a unique opportunity to investigate how GPP in the tropical terrestrial ecosystems responds to climatic forcing. This study uses two GPP products and concurrent climate data to investigate the GPP anomalies and their underlying causes. We find that both GPP products show an enhanced GPP in 2015 for the tropical terrestrial ecosystem as a whole relative to the multiyear mean of 2001–2015, and this enhancement is the net result of GPP increase in tropical forests and decrease in nonforests. We show that the increased GPP in tropical forests during the El Nino event is consistent with increased photosynthesis active radiation as a result of a reduction in clouds, while the decreased GPP in nonforests is consistent with increased water stress as a result of a reduction of precipitation and an increase of temperature. These results reveal the strong coupling of ecosystem and climate that is different in forest and nonforest ecosystems and provide a test case for carbon cycle parameterization and carbon-climate feedback simulation in models.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [4]
  1. Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). International Center for Climate and Environment Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics; Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences
  2. Columbia Univ., New York, NY (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Engineering
  3. Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China). International Center for Climate and Environment Sciences, Inst. of Atmospheric Physics; Nanjing Univ. of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing (China). Collaborative Innovation Center on Forecast and Evaluation of Meteorological Disasters
  4. Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States). Dept. of Microbiology and Plant Biology
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1563960
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1476699
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 123; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 2169-8953
Publisher:
American Geophysical Union
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Zhu, Jiawen, Zhang, Minghua, Zhang, Yao, Zeng, Xiaodong, and Xiao, Xiangming. Response of Tropical Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to the Super El Niño Event in 2015. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1029/2018jg004571.
Zhu, Jiawen, Zhang, Minghua, Zhang, Yao, Zeng, Xiaodong, & Xiao, Xiangming. Response of Tropical Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to the Super El Niño Event in 2015. United States. doi:10.1029/2018jg004571.
Zhu, Jiawen, Zhang, Minghua, Zhang, Yao, Zeng, Xiaodong, and Xiao, Xiangming. Mon . "Response of Tropical Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to the Super El Niño Event in 2015". United States. doi:10.1029/2018jg004571. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1563960.
@article{osti_1563960,
title = {Response of Tropical Terrestrial Gross Primary Production to the Super El Niño Event in 2015},
author = {Zhu, Jiawen and Zhang, Minghua and Zhang, Yao and Zeng, Xiaodong and Xiao, Xiangming},
abstractNote = {The gross primary production (GPP) in tropical terrestrial ecosystems plays a critical role in the global carbon cycle and climate change. The strong 2015–2016 El Niño event offers a unique opportunity to investigate how GPP in the tropical terrestrial ecosystems responds to climatic forcing. This study uses two GPP products and concurrent climate data to investigate the GPP anomalies and their underlying causes. We find that both GPP products show an enhanced GPP in 2015 for the tropical terrestrial ecosystem as a whole relative to the multiyear mean of 2001–2015, and this enhancement is the net result of GPP increase in tropical forests and decrease in nonforests. We show that the increased GPP in tropical forests during the El Nino event is consistent with increased photosynthesis active radiation as a result of a reduction in clouds, while the decreased GPP in nonforests is consistent with increased water stress as a result of a reduction of precipitation and an increase of temperature. These results reveal the strong coupling of ecosystem and climate that is different in forest and nonforest ecosystems and provide a test case for carbon cycle parameterization and carbon-climate feedback simulation in models.},
doi = {10.1029/2018jg004571},
journal = {Journal of Geophysical Research. Biogeosciences},
number = 10,
volume = 123,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {9}
}

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