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Title: Spatial, Temporal, and Phylogenetic Scales of Microbial Ecology

Abstract

Microbial communities play a major role in disease, biogeochemical cycling, agriculture, and bioremediation. However, identifying the ecological processes that govern microbial community assembly and disentangling the relative impacts of those processes has proven challenging. Here, we propose that this discord is due to microbial systems being studied at different spatial, temporal, and phylogenetic scales. We argue that different processes dominate at different scales, and that through a more explicit consideration of spatial, temporal, and phylogenetic grains and extents (the two components of scale) a more accurate, clear, and useful understanding of microbial community assembly can be developed. We demonstrate the value of applying ecological concepts of scale to microbiology, specifically examining their application to nestedness, legacy effects, and taxa-area relationships of microbial systems. These proposed considerations of scale will help resolve long-standing debates in microbial ecology regarding the processes determining the assembly of microbial communities, and provide organizing principles around which hypotheses and theories can be developed.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. USDOE Joint Genome Institute (JGI), Walnut Creek, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1562986
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1580847
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Trends in Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 27; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0966-842X
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; grain; extent; unification; nestedness; legacy effect; species–area relationship

Citation Formats

Ladau, Joshua, and Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A. Spatial, Temporal, and Phylogenetic Scales of Microbial Ecology. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2019.03.003.
Ladau, Joshua, & Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A. Spatial, Temporal, and Phylogenetic Scales of Microbial Ecology. United States. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2019.03.003.
Ladau, Joshua, and Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A. Mon . "Spatial, Temporal, and Phylogenetic Scales of Microbial Ecology". United States. doi:10.1016/j.tim.2019.03.003.
@article{osti_1562986,
title = {Spatial, Temporal, and Phylogenetic Scales of Microbial Ecology},
author = {Ladau, Joshua and Eloe-Fadrosh, Emiley A.},
abstractNote = {Microbial communities play a major role in disease, biogeochemical cycling, agriculture, and bioremediation. However, identifying the ecological processes that govern microbial community assembly and disentangling the relative impacts of those processes has proven challenging. Here, we propose that this discord is due to microbial systems being studied at different spatial, temporal, and phylogenetic scales. We argue that different processes dominate at different scales, and that through a more explicit consideration of spatial, temporal, and phylogenetic grains and extents (the two components of scale) a more accurate, clear, and useful understanding of microbial community assembly can be developed. We demonstrate the value of applying ecological concepts of scale to microbiology, specifically examining their application to nestedness, legacy effects, and taxa-area relationships of microbial systems. These proposed considerations of scale will help resolve long-standing debates in microbial ecology regarding the processes determining the assembly of microbial communities, and provide organizing principles around which hypotheses and theories can be developed.},
doi = {10.1016/j.tim.2019.03.003},
journal = {Trends in Microbiology},
number = 8,
volume = 27,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.1016/j.tim.2019.03.003

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3 works
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