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Title: Molecular Control of Internal Crystallization and Photocatalytic Function in Supramolecular Nanostructures

Abstract

Supramolecular chemistry, which focuses in part on our understanding of many molecule systems, can be a useful tool in the development of novel strategies for renewable and clean energy technologies. In plants, assemblies of light-absorbing molecules arrange themselves in configurations that optimize their ability to efficiently collect light from the sun and utilize that energy for the production of useful chemicals. The function of these systems is critically dependent on the interactions of molecules within nanoscale structures present in green leaves. The long-term objective of this work is to learn how to design soft materials containing light-harvesting molecules and catalysts to create biomimetic systems that create fuels and other useful products by using sunlight as the energy source. Furthermore, we have synthesized molecules and developed methods to manipulate their assembly into nanostructures that are highly effective at collecting light and participate in its conversion to chemical energy.

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRC) (United States). Center for Bio-Inspired Energy Science (CBES); Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES)
OSTI Identifier:
1562969
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1822188
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0001059; AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Chem
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Chem Journal Volume: 4 Journal Issue: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2451-9294
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS; rylene; supramolecular chemistry; photocatalysis; charge-transfer; exciton; crystallization

Citation Formats

Kazantsev, Roman V., Dannenhoffer, Adam J., Aytun, Taner, Harutyunyan, Boris, Fairfield, Daniel J., Bedzyk, Michael J., and Stupp, Samuel I.. Molecular Control of Internal Crystallization and Photocatalytic Function in Supramolecular Nanostructures. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chempr.2018.04.002.
Kazantsev, Roman V., Dannenhoffer, Adam J., Aytun, Taner, Harutyunyan, Boris, Fairfield, Daniel J., Bedzyk, Michael J., & Stupp, Samuel I.. Molecular Control of Internal Crystallization and Photocatalytic Function in Supramolecular Nanostructures. United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chempr.2018.04.002
Kazantsev, Roman V., Dannenhoffer, Adam J., Aytun, Taner, Harutyunyan, Boris, Fairfield, Daniel J., Bedzyk, Michael J., and Stupp, Samuel I.. Sun . "Molecular Control of Internal Crystallization and Photocatalytic Function in Supramolecular Nanostructures". United States. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chempr.2018.04.002.
@article{osti_1562969,
title = {Molecular Control of Internal Crystallization and Photocatalytic Function in Supramolecular Nanostructures},
author = {Kazantsev, Roman V. and Dannenhoffer, Adam J. and Aytun, Taner and Harutyunyan, Boris and Fairfield, Daniel J. and Bedzyk, Michael J. and Stupp, Samuel I.},
abstractNote = {Supramolecular chemistry, which focuses in part on our understanding of many molecule systems, can be a useful tool in the development of novel strategies for renewable and clean energy technologies. In plants, assemblies of light-absorbing molecules arrange themselves in configurations that optimize their ability to efficiently collect light from the sun and utilize that energy for the production of useful chemicals. The function of these systems is critically dependent on the interactions of molecules within nanoscale structures present in green leaves. The long-term objective of this work is to learn how to design soft materials containing light-harvesting molecules and catalysts to create biomimetic systems that create fuels and other useful products by using sunlight as the energy source. Furthermore, we have synthesized molecules and developed methods to manipulate their assembly into nanostructures that are highly effective at collecting light and participate in its conversion to chemical energy.},
doi = {10.1016/j.chempr.2018.04.002},
journal = {Chem},
number = 7,
volume = 4,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {7}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
https://doi.org/10.1016/j.chempr.2018.04.002

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 9 works
Citation information provided by
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