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Title: 14C-Cobalamin Absorption from Endogenously Labeled Chicken Eggs Assessed in Humans Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry

Abstract

Traditionally, the bioavailability of vitamin B-12 (B12) from in vivo labeled foods was determined by labeling the vitamin with radiocobalt ( 57Co, 58Co or 60Co). This required use of penetrating radioactivity and sometimes used higher doses of B12 than the physiological limit of B12 absorption. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability and absorbed B12 from chicken eggs endogenously labeled with 14C-B12 using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 14C-B12 was injected intramuscularly into hens to produce eggs enriched in vivo with the 14C labeled vitamin. The eggs, which provided 1.4 to 2.6 μg of B12 (~1.1 kBq) per serving, were scrambled, cooked and fed to 10 human volunteers. Baseline and post-ingestion blood, urine and stool samples were collected over a one-week period and assessed for 14C-B12 content using AMS. Bioavailability ranged from 13.2 to 57.7% (mean 30.2 ± 16.4%). Difference among subjects was explained by dose of B12, with percent bioavailability from 2.6 μg only half that from 1.4 μg. The total amount of B12 absorbed was limited to 0.5–0.8 μg (mean 0.55 ± 0.19 μg B12) and was relatively unaffected by the amount consumed. The use of 14C-B12 offers the only currently available method for quantifying B12more » absorption in humans, including food cobalamin absorption. An egg is confirmed as a good source of B12, supplying approximately 20% of the average adult daily requirement (RDA for adults = 2.4 μg/day).« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [2]; ORCiD logo [4]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. US Dept. of Agriculture (USDA), Davis, CA (United States). ARS Western Human Nutrition Research Center
  2. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)
  3. Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
  4. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); National Institutes of Health (NIH)
OSTI Identifier:
1562375
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-757858
Journal ID: ISSN 2072-6643; NUTRHU; 945835
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nutrients
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 11; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 2072-6643
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; cobalamin; vitamin B12; bioavailability; eggs; endogenous label; human; accelerator mass spectrometry

Citation Formats

Garrod, Marjorie G., Rossow, Heidi A., Calvert, Christopher C., Miller, Joshua W., Green, Ralph, Buchholz, Bruce A., and Allen, Lindsay H. 14C-Cobalamin Absorption from Endogenously Labeled Chicken Eggs Assessed in Humans Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/nu11092148.
Garrod, Marjorie G., Rossow, Heidi A., Calvert, Christopher C., Miller, Joshua W., Green, Ralph, Buchholz, Bruce A., & Allen, Lindsay H. 14C-Cobalamin Absorption from Endogenously Labeled Chicken Eggs Assessed in Humans Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry. United States. doi:10.3390/nu11092148.
Garrod, Marjorie G., Rossow, Heidi A., Calvert, Christopher C., Miller, Joshua W., Green, Ralph, Buchholz, Bruce A., and Allen, Lindsay H. Sun . "14C-Cobalamin Absorption from Endogenously Labeled Chicken Eggs Assessed in Humans Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry". United States. doi:10.3390/nu11092148. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1562375.
@article{osti_1562375,
title = {14C-Cobalamin Absorption from Endogenously Labeled Chicken Eggs Assessed in Humans Using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry},
author = {Garrod, Marjorie G. and Rossow, Heidi A. and Calvert, Christopher C. and Miller, Joshua W. and Green, Ralph and Buchholz, Bruce A. and Allen, Lindsay H.},
abstractNote = {Traditionally, the bioavailability of vitamin B-12 (B12) from in vivo labeled foods was determined by labeling the vitamin with radiocobalt (57Co, 58Co or 60Co). This required use of penetrating radioactivity and sometimes used higher doses of B12 than the physiological limit of B12 absorption. The aim of this study was to determine the bioavailability and absorbed B12 from chicken eggs endogenously labeled with 14C-B12 using accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS). 14C-B12 was injected intramuscularly into hens to produce eggs enriched in vivo with the 14C labeled vitamin. The eggs, which provided 1.4 to 2.6 μg of B12 (~1.1 kBq) per serving, were scrambled, cooked and fed to 10 human volunteers. Baseline and post-ingestion blood, urine and stool samples were collected over a one-week period and assessed for 14C-B12 content using AMS. Bioavailability ranged from 13.2 to 57.7% (mean 30.2 ± 16.4%). Difference among subjects was explained by dose of B12, with percent bioavailability from 2.6 μg only half that from 1.4 μg. The total amount of B12 absorbed was limited to 0.5–0.8 μg (mean 0.55 ± 0.19 μg B12) and was relatively unaffected by the amount consumed. The use of 14C-B12 offers the only currently available method for quantifying B12 absorption in humans, including food cobalamin absorption. An egg is confirmed as a good source of B12, supplying approximately 20% of the average adult daily requirement (RDA for adults = 2.4 μg/day).},
doi = {10.3390/nu11092148},
journal = {Nutrients},
number = 9,
volume = 11,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

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