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Title: Interfacing nature’s catalytic machinery with synthetic materials for semi-artificial photosynthesis

Abstract

Semi-artificial photosynthetic systems aim to overcome the limitations of natural and artificial photosynthesis while providing an opportunity to investigate their respective functionality. The progress and studies of these hybrid systems is the focus of this forward-looking perspective. Enzymes have been interfaced with synthetic materials and employed for semi-artificial fuel production. In parallel, we examine how more complex living cellular systems can be recruited for in vivo fuel and chemical production in an approach where inorganic nanostructures are hybridized with photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic microorganisms. Side-by-side comparisons reveal strengths and limitations of enzyme- and microorganism-based hybrid systems, and how lessons extracted from studying enzyme hybrids can be applied to investigations of microorganism-hybrid devices. Here, we conclude by putting semi-artificial photosynthesis in the context of its own ambitions and discuss how it can help address the grand challenges facing artificial systems for the efficient generation of solar fuels and chemicals.

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  2. Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry
  3. Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States). Dept. of Systems Biology
  4. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry, and Dept. of Materials Science; Kavli Energy NanoSciences Inst., Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Chemical Sciences Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22), Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division (SC-22.1)
OSTI Identifier:
1561899
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Nanotechnology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13; Journal Issue: 10; Journal ID: ISSN 1748-3387
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Kornienko, Nikolay, Zhang, Jenny Z., Sakimoto, Kelsey K., Yang, Peidong, and Reisner, Erwin. Interfacing nature’s catalytic machinery with synthetic materials for semi-artificial photosynthesis. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1038/s41565-018-0251-7.
Kornienko, Nikolay, Zhang, Jenny Z., Sakimoto, Kelsey K., Yang, Peidong, & Reisner, Erwin. Interfacing nature’s catalytic machinery with synthetic materials for semi-artificial photosynthesis. United States. doi:10.1038/s41565-018-0251-7.
Kornienko, Nikolay, Zhang, Jenny Z., Sakimoto, Kelsey K., Yang, Peidong, and Reisner, Erwin. Fri . "Interfacing nature’s catalytic machinery with synthetic materials for semi-artificial photosynthesis". United States. doi:10.1038/s41565-018-0251-7. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1561899.
@article{osti_1561899,
title = {Interfacing nature’s catalytic machinery with synthetic materials for semi-artificial photosynthesis},
author = {Kornienko, Nikolay and Zhang, Jenny Z. and Sakimoto, Kelsey K. and Yang, Peidong and Reisner, Erwin},
abstractNote = {Semi-artificial photosynthetic systems aim to overcome the limitations of natural and artificial photosynthesis while providing an opportunity to investigate their respective functionality. The progress and studies of these hybrid systems is the focus of this forward-looking perspective. Enzymes have been interfaced with synthetic materials and employed for semi-artificial fuel production. In parallel, we examine how more complex living cellular systems can be recruited for in vivo fuel and chemical production in an approach where inorganic nanostructures are hybridized with photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic microorganisms. Side-by-side comparisons reveal strengths and limitations of enzyme- and microorganism-based hybrid systems, and how lessons extracted from studying enzyme hybrids can be applied to investigations of microorganism-hybrid devices. Here, we conclude by putting semi-artificial photosynthesis in the context of its own ambitions and discuss how it can help address the grand challenges facing artificial systems for the efficient generation of solar fuels and chemicals.},
doi = {10.1038/s41565-018-0251-7},
journal = {Nature Nanotechnology},
number = 10,
volume = 13,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {10}
}

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Cited by: 19 works
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