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Title: Soil microclimates influence annual carbon loss via heterotrophic soil respiration in maize and switchgrass bioenergy cropping systems

Abstract

Heterotrophic soil respiration (R H) is the main pathway of carbon (C) loss from litter and soil organic matter, and thus R H partially determines ecosystem C storage. Because R H is sensitive to soil temperature and moisture, aboveground factors that influence soil microclimate, such as plant structure and residue management, may in turn affect belowground C loss via R H, but this relationship has not been quantified. Here, e examined multiyear soil microclimate differences to 1-m depth, measured seasonal trends of R H, and parameterized crop-specific microclimate-RH models to quantify the effect of soil microclimate differences on annual R H in temperate no-till maize and switchgrass bioenergy cropping systems. Summertime soil temperatures were typically warmer in maize compared to switchgrass, likely resulting from lower leaf area index (LAI) in maize. In contrast, winter soil temperatures were usually warmer in switchgrass than maize, due in part to more consistent snow retention within the switchgrass litter stubble. Daily soil temperature ranges were less extreme in the perennial switchgrass system compared to the annual no-till maize system. Soil moisture near the soil surface was usually lower in maize than switchgrass, but the opposite was true below about 50 cm. R H showedmore » strong seasonal trends, with warmer and drier soil conditions generally leading to higher R H in both crops. Modeled scenarios indicated that the differences in crop-specific soil microclimates accounted for 4 to 17% of the annual R H flux, with the dominant soil microclimate effects on R H occurring during the summer. So, the soil microclimate serves as a strong coupling between aboveground properties and belowground C loss via R H in temperate agroecosystems. Agricultural management practices such as planting date, plant density, and residue management could be targeted to promote soil microclimates that reduce R H, thereby reducing gaseous belowground C losses and potentially enhancing ecosystem C storage.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1561263
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1561343
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0018420; FC02-07ER64494; AC05-76RL01830; DEB-1038759
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 279; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0168-1923
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; Soil temperature; Soil moisture; Soil respiration; CO2 flux; Soil organic matter; Biofuels

Citation Formats

von Haden, Adam C., Marín-Spiotta, Erika, Jackson, Randall D., and Kucharik, Christopher J. Soil microclimates influence annual carbon loss via heterotrophic soil respiration in maize and switchgrass bioenergy cropping systems. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2019.107731.
von Haden, Adam C., Marín-Spiotta, Erika, Jackson, Randall D., & Kucharik, Christopher J. Soil microclimates influence annual carbon loss via heterotrophic soil respiration in maize and switchgrass bioenergy cropping systems. United States. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2019.107731.
von Haden, Adam C., Marín-Spiotta, Erika, Jackson, Randall D., and Kucharik, Christopher J. Wed . "Soil microclimates influence annual carbon loss via heterotrophic soil respiration in maize and switchgrass bioenergy cropping systems". United States. doi:10.1016/j.agrformet.2019.107731.
@article{osti_1561263,
title = {Soil microclimates influence annual carbon loss via heterotrophic soil respiration in maize and switchgrass bioenergy cropping systems},
author = {von Haden, Adam C. and Marín-Spiotta, Erika and Jackson, Randall D. and Kucharik, Christopher J.},
abstractNote = {Heterotrophic soil respiration (RH) is the main pathway of carbon (C) loss from litter and soil organic matter, and thus RH partially determines ecosystem C storage. Because RH is sensitive to soil temperature and moisture, aboveground factors that influence soil microclimate, such as plant structure and residue management, may in turn affect belowground C loss via RH, but this relationship has not been quantified. Here, e examined multiyear soil microclimate differences to 1-m depth, measured seasonal trends of RH, and parameterized crop-specific microclimate-RH models to quantify the effect of soil microclimate differences on annual RH in temperate no-till maize and switchgrass bioenergy cropping systems. Summertime soil temperatures were typically warmer in maize compared to switchgrass, likely resulting from lower leaf area index (LAI) in maize. In contrast, winter soil temperatures were usually warmer in switchgrass than maize, due in part to more consistent snow retention within the switchgrass litter stubble. Daily soil temperature ranges were less extreme in the perennial switchgrass system compared to the annual no-till maize system. Soil moisture near the soil surface was usually lower in maize than switchgrass, but the opposite was true below about 50 cm. RH showed strong seasonal trends, with warmer and drier soil conditions generally leading to higher RH in both crops. Modeled scenarios indicated that the differences in crop-specific soil microclimates accounted for 4 to 17% of the annual RH flux, with the dominant soil microclimate effects on RH occurring during the summer. So, the soil microclimate serves as a strong coupling between aboveground properties and belowground C loss via RH in temperate agroecosystems. Agricultural management practices such as planting date, plant density, and residue management could be targeted to promote soil microclimates that reduce RH, thereby reducing gaseous belowground C losses and potentially enhancing ecosystem C storage.},
doi = {10.1016/j.agrformet.2019.107731},
journal = {Agricultural and Forest Meteorology},
number = C,
volume = 279,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

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This content will become publicly available on September 11, 2020
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