skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

This content will become publicly available on January 23, 2020

Title: Ultrathin oxide layers for nanoscale integration of molecular light absorbers, catalysts, and complete artificial photosystems

Abstract

Artificial photosynthesis is an attractive approach for the generation of renewable fuels because such systems will be suitable for deployment on highly abundant, non-arable land. Recently emerged methods of nanoscience to create conformal, ultrathin oxide layers enable the hierarchical integration of light absorbers, catalysts, and membranes into systems with far simpler synthetic approaches than available till now. This holds in particular for the coupling of molecular light absorbers and catalysts for sunlight to fuel conversion, providing photoelectrodes with greatly improved stability. Moreover, the use of ultrathin inert oxides as proton conducting, molecule impermeable membranes has opened up the integration of reduction and oxidation half reactions into complete photosynthetic systems on the shortest possible length scale-the nanometer scale. This capability affords minimization of energy-degrading resistance losses caused by ion transport over macroscale distances while separating the incompatible water oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction catalysis environments on the nanoscale. Understanding of charge transport between molecular components embedded in the oxide layers is critical for guiding synthetic design improvements of the light absorber-catalyst units to optimize performance and integrate them into complete artificial photosystems. Recent results and insights from transient optical, vibrational, and photoelectrochemical studies are presented, and future challenges and opportunities formore » engaging dynamic spectroscopies to accelerate the development of nanoscale integrated artificial photosystems are discussed.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Molecular Biophysics and Integrated Bioimaging Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22). Chemical Sciences, Geosciences & Biosciences Division; German Research Foundation (DFG)
OSTI Identifier:
1560576
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Chemical Physics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 150; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-9606
Publisher:
American Institute of Physics (AIP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Katsoukis, Georgios, and Frei, Heinz. Ultrathin oxide layers for nanoscale integration of molecular light absorbers, catalysts, and complete artificial photosystems. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1063/1.5052453.
Katsoukis, Georgios, & Frei, Heinz. Ultrathin oxide layers for nanoscale integration of molecular light absorbers, catalysts, and complete artificial photosystems. United States. doi:10.1063/1.5052453.
Katsoukis, Georgios, and Frei, Heinz. Wed . "Ultrathin oxide layers for nanoscale integration of molecular light absorbers, catalysts, and complete artificial photosystems". United States. doi:10.1063/1.5052453.
@article{osti_1560576,
title = {Ultrathin oxide layers for nanoscale integration of molecular light absorbers, catalysts, and complete artificial photosystems},
author = {Katsoukis, Georgios and Frei, Heinz},
abstractNote = {Artificial photosynthesis is an attractive approach for the generation of renewable fuels because such systems will be suitable for deployment on highly abundant, non-arable land. Recently emerged methods of nanoscience to create conformal, ultrathin oxide layers enable the hierarchical integration of light absorbers, catalysts, and membranes into systems with far simpler synthetic approaches than available till now. This holds in particular for the coupling of molecular light absorbers and catalysts for sunlight to fuel conversion, providing photoelectrodes with greatly improved stability. Moreover, the use of ultrathin inert oxides as proton conducting, molecule impermeable membranes has opened up the integration of reduction and oxidation half reactions into complete photosynthetic systems on the shortest possible length scale-the nanometer scale. This capability affords minimization of energy-degrading resistance losses caused by ion transport over macroscale distances while separating the incompatible water oxidation and carbon dioxide reduction catalysis environments on the nanoscale. Understanding of charge transport between molecular components embedded in the oxide layers is critical for guiding synthetic design improvements of the light absorber-catalyst units to optimize performance and integrate them into complete artificial photosystems. Recent results and insights from transient optical, vibrational, and photoelectrochemical studies are presented, and future challenges and opportunities for engaging dynamic spectroscopies to accelerate the development of nanoscale integrated artificial photosystems are discussed.},
doi = {10.1063/1.5052453},
journal = {Journal of Chemical Physics},
number = 4,
volume = 150,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {1}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on January 23, 2020
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 3 works
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Electrochemical CO2 Reduction on Metal Electrodes
book, January 2008


Stable solar-driven oxidation of water by semiconducting photoanodes protected by transparent catalytic nickel oxide films
journal, March 2015

  • Sun, Ke; Saadi, Fadl H.; Lichterman, Michael F.
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Vol. 112, Issue 12, p. 3612-3617
  • DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1423034112

Limiting and realizable efficiencies of solar photolysis of water
journal, August 1985

  • Bolton, James R.; Strickler, Stewart J.; Connolly, John S.
  • Nature, Vol. 316, Issue 6028, p. 495-500
  • DOI: 10.1038/316495a0

Comparing Photosynthetic and Photovoltaic Efficiencies and Recognizing the Potential for Improvement
journal, May 2011

  • Blankenship, R. E.; Tiede, D. M.; Barber, J.
  • Science, Vol. 332, Issue 6031, p. 805-809
  • DOI: 10.1126/science.1200165

Photoassisted Overall Water Splitting in a Visible Light-Absorbing Dye-Sensitized Photoelectrochemical Cell
journal, January 2009

  • Youngblood, W. Justin; Lee, Seung-Hyun Anna; Kobayashi, Yoji
  • Journal of the American Chemical Society, Vol. 131, Issue 3, p. 926-927
  • DOI: 10.1021/ja809108y