skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

This content will become publicly available on September 2, 2020

Title: Spray characterization for engine combustion network Spray G injector using high-fidelity simulation with detailed injector geometry

Abstract

This article presents a computational fluid dynamics study of the engine combustion network Spray G, focusing on the transient characteristics of the spray during the start of injection and the impacts of nozzle geometry details derived from the manufacturing process. The large-eddy-simulation method, coupled with the volume-of-fluid method, was used to model the high-speed turbulent two-phase flow. A moving-needle boundary condition was applied to capture the internal flow boundary condition accurately. The injector geometry was measured with micron-level resolution using X-ray tomographic imaging at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, providing detailed machining tolerance and defects from manufacturing and a realistic rough surface. For comparison, a nominal geometry and a modified geometry incorporating measured large-scale geometric features but no surface details were also used in the simulations. Spray characteristics such as mass flow rate, injection velocity, and Sauter mean diameter were analyzed. Significantly distinct spray characteristics in terms of injection velocity, spray morphology, and primary breakup mechanism were predicted using different nozzle geometries, which is mainly attributable to the realistic surface finish and manufacturing defects. The measured high-resolution geometry predicts a lower injection velocity, a wider-spreading spray, and an overall slower breakup rate with evident injector tip wettingmore » compared to the ideally smooth nozzle boundary. This result implies that the manufacturing details of the injector, which are usually ignored in fuel injection studies, have a significant impact on the spray development process and should be taken into account for design optimization.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL, USA
  2. Department of Engineering, University of Perugia, Perugia, Italy
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1560242
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
International Journal of Engine Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: International Journal of Engine Research; Journal ID: ISSN 1468-0874
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Yue, Zongyu, Battistoni, Michele, and Som, Sibendu. Spray characterization for engine combustion network Spray G injector using high-fidelity simulation with detailed injector geometry. United Kingdom: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1177/1468087419872398.
Yue, Zongyu, Battistoni, Michele, & Som, Sibendu. Spray characterization for engine combustion network Spray G injector using high-fidelity simulation with detailed injector geometry. United Kingdom. doi:10.1177/1468087419872398.
Yue, Zongyu, Battistoni, Michele, and Som, Sibendu. Mon . "Spray characterization for engine combustion network Spray G injector using high-fidelity simulation with detailed injector geometry". United Kingdom. doi:10.1177/1468087419872398.
@article{osti_1560242,
title = {Spray characterization for engine combustion network Spray G injector using high-fidelity simulation with detailed injector geometry},
author = {Yue, Zongyu and Battistoni, Michele and Som, Sibendu},
abstractNote = {This article presents a computational fluid dynamics study of the engine combustion network Spray G, focusing on the transient characteristics of the spray during the start of injection and the impacts of nozzle geometry details derived from the manufacturing process. The large-eddy-simulation method, coupled with the volume-of-fluid method, was used to model the high-speed turbulent two-phase flow. A moving-needle boundary condition was applied to capture the internal flow boundary condition accurately. The injector geometry was measured with micron-level resolution using X-ray tomographic imaging at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, providing detailed machining tolerance and defects from manufacturing and a realistic rough surface. For comparison, a nominal geometry and a modified geometry incorporating measured large-scale geometric features but no surface details were also used in the simulations. Spray characteristics such as mass flow rate, injection velocity, and Sauter mean diameter were analyzed. Significantly distinct spray characteristics in terms of injection velocity, spray morphology, and primary breakup mechanism were predicted using different nozzle geometries, which is mainly attributable to the realistic surface finish and manufacturing defects. The measured high-resolution geometry predicts a lower injection velocity, a wider-spreading spray, and an overall slower breakup rate with evident injector tip wetting compared to the ideally smooth nozzle boundary. This result implies that the manufacturing details of the injector, which are usually ignored in fuel injection studies, have a significant impact on the spray development process and should be taken into account for design optimization.},
doi = {10.1177/1468087419872398},
journal = {International Journal of Engine Research},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = {2019},
month = {9}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
This content will become publicly available on September 2, 2020
Publisher's Version of Record

Save / Share: