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Title: The effects of different types of additives on growth of biomineral phases investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy

Abstract

In this study, interactions between different types of additives with specific crystal surfaces of mineral phases found in biominerals were investigated at nanometer and micrometer scales by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Firstly, the inhibitory effect of magnesium ion (Mg 2+) and that of a peptide molecule, L-aspartic acid 6mer (L-Asp 6) on the growth of a fast growing [-10-1] step on the (-101) face of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal are quantitatively compared by the step speed data. Differences in the inhibitory effect are explained based on a De Yoreo model of step kinetics in detail. The step speed data show that Mg 2+ had a little inhibitory effect on the growth of the [-10-1] step, approaching a limiting value of about 15% reduction in the step speed, whereas L-Asp 6 was substantially more effective in inhibiting the step growth with an ability to stop the growth completely. Secondly, the effects of a protein molecule, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a pseudo protein-like organic particle PSPMA 30-PDPA 47 micelle on the growth of calcite on its {104} faces are compared. Both BSA and PSPMA 30-PDPA 47 micelle temporarily pinned the passing steps without or negligibly inhibiting the stepmore » growth overall. The BSA molecule remained at the crystal surface without incorporation into the crystal because the steps passed through it, pushing it up and out. However, in contrast to the BSA, the micelle was incorporated into the crystal by the passing steps. In conclusion, these results together with other relevant studies suggest that the decisive factor in determining for macromolecules to be incorporated into growing minerals or to remain intact on the mineral surface with no incorporation is the magnitude of binding strength of the macromolecules to the growing step against the step’s propagation force.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [5]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)
  5. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA); USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1548367
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-780940
Journal ID: ISSN 0022-0248; 975985
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344; AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Journal of Crystal Growth
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 509; Journal Issue: C; Journal ID: ISSN 0022-0248
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; A1. Biocrystallization; A1. Impurities; A1. Atomic force microscopy; A1. Surface processes; A2. Growth from solutions

Citation Formats

Cho, Kang Rae, Kulshreshtha, Prashant, Wu, Kuang Jen J., Seto, Jong, Qiu, S. Roger, and De Yoreo, James J. The effects of different types of additives on growth of biomineral phases investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy. United States: N. p., 2018. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2018.12.021.
Cho, Kang Rae, Kulshreshtha, Prashant, Wu, Kuang Jen J., Seto, Jong, Qiu, S. Roger, & De Yoreo, James J. The effects of different types of additives on growth of biomineral phases investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2018.12.021.
Cho, Kang Rae, Kulshreshtha, Prashant, Wu, Kuang Jen J., Seto, Jong, Qiu, S. Roger, and De Yoreo, James J. Sat . "The effects of different types of additives on growth of biomineral phases investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2018.12.021.
@article{osti_1548367,
title = {The effects of different types of additives on growth of biomineral phases investigated by in situ atomic force microscopy},
author = {Cho, Kang Rae and Kulshreshtha, Prashant and Wu, Kuang Jen J. and Seto, Jong and Qiu, S. Roger and De Yoreo, James J.},
abstractNote = {In this study, interactions between different types of additives with specific crystal surfaces of mineral phases found in biominerals were investigated at nanometer and micrometer scales by in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM). Firstly, the inhibitory effect of magnesium ion (Mg2+) and that of a peptide molecule, L-aspartic acid 6mer (L-Asp6) on the growth of a fast growing [-10-1] step on the (-101) face of calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) crystal are quantitatively compared by the step speed data. Differences in the inhibitory effect are explained based on a De Yoreo model of step kinetics in detail. The step speed data show that Mg2+ had a little inhibitory effect on the growth of the [-10-1] step, approaching a limiting value of about 15% reduction in the step speed, whereas L-Asp6 was substantially more effective in inhibiting the step growth with an ability to stop the growth completely. Secondly, the effects of a protein molecule, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and a pseudo protein-like organic particle PSPMA30-PDPA47 micelle on the growth of calcite on its {104} faces are compared. Both BSA and PSPMA30-PDPA47 micelle temporarily pinned the passing steps without or negligibly inhibiting the step growth overall. The BSA molecule remained at the crystal surface without incorporation into the crystal because the steps passed through it, pushing it up and out. However, in contrast to the BSA, the micelle was incorporated into the crystal by the passing steps. In conclusion, these results together with other relevant studies suggest that the decisive factor in determining for macromolecules to be incorporated into growing minerals or to remain intact on the mineral surface with no incorporation is the magnitude of binding strength of the macromolecules to the growing step against the step’s propagation force.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jcrysgro.2018.12.021},
journal = {Journal of Crystal Growth},
number = C,
volume = 509,
place = {United States},
year = {2018},
month = {12}
}

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