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Title: Pathogenic budding yeasts isolated outside of clinical settings

Abstract

Budding yeasts are distributed across a wide range of habitats, including as human commensals. However, under some conditions, these commensals can cause superficial, invasive, and even lethal infections. Despite their importance to human health, little is known about the ecology of these opportunistic pathogens, aside from their associations with mammals and clinical environments. During a survey of approximately 1000 non-clinical samples across the United States of America, we isolated 54 strains of budding yeast species considered opportunistic pathogens, including Candida albicans and Candida (Nakaseomyces) glabrata. We report that, as a group, pathogenic yeasts were positively associated with fruits and soil environments, whereas the species Pichia kudriavzevii (syn. Candida krusei syn. Issatchenkia orientalis) had a significant association with plants. Of the four species that cause 95% of candidiasis, we found a positive association with soil. These results indicate that pathogenic yeast ecology is more complex and diverse than is currently appreciated and raises the possibility that these additional environments could be a point of contact for human infections.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [2];  [2];  [3]; ORCiD logo [3]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); USDOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)
  3. Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States); USDOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
USDOE Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, Madison, WI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Institutes of Health (NIH); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1548305
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0018409
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
FEMS Yeast Research
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19; Journal Issue: 3; Journal ID: ISSN 1567-1364
Publisher:
Federation of European Microbiological Societies - Oxford University Press
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
pathogen; Candida albicans; Candida glabrata; ecology; Candida tropicalis; wild yeasts

Citation Formats

Opulente, Dana A., Langdon, Quinn K., Buh, Kelly V., Haase, Max A. B., Sylvester, Kayla, Moriarty, Ryan V., Jarzyna, Martin, Considine, Samantha L., Schneider, Rachel M., and Hittinger, Chris Todd. Pathogenic budding yeasts isolated outside of clinical settings. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1093/femsyr/foz032.
Opulente, Dana A., Langdon, Quinn K., Buh, Kelly V., Haase, Max A. B., Sylvester, Kayla, Moriarty, Ryan V., Jarzyna, Martin, Considine, Samantha L., Schneider, Rachel M., & Hittinger, Chris Todd. Pathogenic budding yeasts isolated outside of clinical settings. United States. doi:10.1093/femsyr/foz032.
Opulente, Dana A., Langdon, Quinn K., Buh, Kelly V., Haase, Max A. B., Sylvester, Kayla, Moriarty, Ryan V., Jarzyna, Martin, Considine, Samantha L., Schneider, Rachel M., and Hittinger, Chris Todd. Wed . "Pathogenic budding yeasts isolated outside of clinical settings". United States. doi:10.1093/femsyr/foz032.
@article{osti_1548305,
title = {Pathogenic budding yeasts isolated outside of clinical settings},
author = {Opulente, Dana A. and Langdon, Quinn K. and Buh, Kelly V. and Haase, Max A. B. and Sylvester, Kayla and Moriarty, Ryan V. and Jarzyna, Martin and Considine, Samantha L. and Schneider, Rachel M. and Hittinger, Chris Todd},
abstractNote = {Budding yeasts are distributed across a wide range of habitats, including as human commensals. However, under some conditions, these commensals can cause superficial, invasive, and even lethal infections. Despite their importance to human health, little is known about the ecology of these opportunistic pathogens, aside from their associations with mammals and clinical environments. During a survey of approximately 1000 non-clinical samples across the United States of America, we isolated 54 strains of budding yeast species considered opportunistic pathogens, including Candida albicans and Candida (Nakaseomyces) glabrata. We report that, as a group, pathogenic yeasts were positively associated with fruits and soil environments, whereas the species Pichia kudriavzevii (syn. Candida krusei syn. Issatchenkia orientalis) had a significant association with plants. Of the four species that cause 95% of candidiasis, we found a positive association with soil. These results indicate that pathogenic yeast ecology is more complex and diverse than is currently appreciated and raises the possibility that these additional environments could be a point of contact for human infections.},
doi = {10.1093/femsyr/foz032},
journal = {FEMS Yeast Research},
number = 3,
volume = 19,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

Journal Article:
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This content will become publicly available on April 24, 2020
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