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Title: Evolution of a novel chimeric maltotriose transporter in Saccharomyces eubayanus from parent proteins unable to perform this function

Abstract

At the molecular level, the evolution of new traits can be broadly divided between changes in gene expression and changes in protein-coding sequence. For proteins, the evolution of novel functions is generally thought to proceed through sequential point mutations or recombination of whole functional units. In Saccharomyces, the uptake of the sugar maltotriose into the cell is the primary limiting factor in its utilization, but maltotriose transporters are relatively rare, except in brewing strains. No known wild strains of Saccharomyces eubayanus, the cold-tolerant parent of hybrid lager-brewing yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae x S. eubayanus), are able to consume maltotriose, which limits their ability to fully ferment malt extract. In one strain of S. eubayanus, we found a gene closely related to a known maltotriose transporter and were able to confer maltotriose consumption by overexpressing this gene or by passaging the strain on maltose. Even so, most wild strains of S. eubayanus lack native maltotriose transporters. To determine how this rare trait could evolve in naive genetic backgrounds, we performed an adaptive evolution experiment for maltotriose consumption, which yielded a single strain of S. eubayanus able to grow on maltotriose. We mapped the causative locus to a gene encoding a novel chimericmore » transporter that was formed by an ectopic recombination event between two genes encoding transporters that are unable to import maltotriose. In contrast to classic models of the evolution of novel protein functions, the recombination breakpoints occurred within a single functional domain. Thus, the ability of the new protein to carry maltotriose was likely acquired through epistatic interactions between independently evolved substitutions. By acquiring multiple mutations at once, the transporter rapidly gained a novel function, while bypassing potentially deleterious intermediate steps. This study provides an illuminating example of how recombination between paralogs can establish novel interactions among substitutions to create adaptive functions.« less

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1]
  1. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23); National Science Foundation (NSF); USDA
OSTI Identifier:
1546688
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0018409; DEB-1253634
Resource Type:
Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
PLoS Genetics
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 15; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1553-7404
Publisher:
Public Library of Science
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Baker, EmilyClare P., Hittinger, Chris Todd, and Zhang, Jianzhi. Evolution of a novel chimeric maltotriose transporter in Saccharomyces eubayanus from parent proteins unable to perform this function. United States: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1007786.
Baker, EmilyClare P., Hittinger, Chris Todd, & Zhang, Jianzhi. Evolution of a novel chimeric maltotriose transporter in Saccharomyces eubayanus from parent proteins unable to perform this function. United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1007786.
Baker, EmilyClare P., Hittinger, Chris Todd, and Zhang, Jianzhi. Thu . "Evolution of a novel chimeric maltotriose transporter in Saccharomyces eubayanus from parent proteins unable to perform this function". United States. doi:10.1371/journal.pgen.1007786. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1546688.
@article{osti_1546688,
title = {Evolution of a novel chimeric maltotriose transporter in Saccharomyces eubayanus from parent proteins unable to perform this function},
author = {Baker, EmilyClare P. and Hittinger, Chris Todd and Zhang, Jianzhi},
abstractNote = {At the molecular level, the evolution of new traits can be broadly divided between changes in gene expression and changes in protein-coding sequence. For proteins, the evolution of novel functions is generally thought to proceed through sequential point mutations or recombination of whole functional units. In Saccharomyces, the uptake of the sugar maltotriose into the cell is the primary limiting factor in its utilization, but maltotriose transporters are relatively rare, except in brewing strains. No known wild strains of Saccharomyces eubayanus, the cold-tolerant parent of hybrid lager-brewing yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae x S. eubayanus), are able to consume maltotriose, which limits their ability to fully ferment malt extract. In one strain of S. eubayanus, we found a gene closely related to a known maltotriose transporter and were able to confer maltotriose consumption by overexpressing this gene or by passaging the strain on maltose. Even so, most wild strains of S. eubayanus lack native maltotriose transporters. To determine how this rare trait could evolve in naive genetic backgrounds, we performed an adaptive evolution experiment for maltotriose consumption, which yielded a single strain of S. eubayanus able to grow on maltotriose. We mapped the causative locus to a gene encoding a novel chimeric transporter that was formed by an ectopic recombination event between two genes encoding transporters that are unable to import maltotriose. In contrast to classic models of the evolution of novel protein functions, the recombination breakpoints occurred within a single functional domain. Thus, the ability of the new protein to carry maltotriose was likely acquired through epistatic interactions between independently evolved substitutions. By acquiring multiple mutations at once, the transporter rapidly gained a novel function, while bypassing potentially deleterious intermediate steps. This study provides an illuminating example of how recombination between paralogs can establish novel interactions among substitutions to create adaptive functions.},
doi = {10.1371/journal.pgen.1007786},
journal = {PLoS Genetics},
number = 4,
volume = 15,
place = {United States},
year = {2019},
month = {4}
}

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