skip to main content
DOE PAGES title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Evaluation of Stream and Wetland Restoration Using UAS-Based Thermal Infrared Mapping

Abstract

Large-scale wetland restoration often focuses on repairing the hydrologic connections degraded by anthropogenic modifications. Of these hydrologic connections, groundwater discharge is an important target, as these surface water ecosystem control points are important for thermal stability, among other ecosystem services. However, evaluating the effectiveness of the restoration activities on establishing groundwater discharge connection is often difficult over large areas and inaccessible terrain. Unoccupied aircraft systems (UAS) are now routinely used for collecting aerial imagery and creating digital surface models (DSM). Lightweight thermal infrared (TIR) sensors provide another payload option for generation of sub-meter-resolution aerial TIR orthophotos. This technology allows for the rapid and safe survey of groundwater discharge areas. Aerial TIR water-surface data were collected in March 2019 at Tidmarsh Farms, a former commercial cranberry peatland located in coastal Massachusetts, USA (41°54′17″ N 70°34′17″ W), where stream and wetland restoration actions were completed in 2016. Here, we present a 0.4 km2 georeferenced, temperature-calibrated TIR orthophoto of the area. The image represents a mosaic of nearly 900 TIR images captured by UAS in a single morning with a total flight time of 36 min and is supported by a DSM derived from UAS-visible imagery. The survey was conducted in winter tomore » maximize temperature contrast between relatively warm groundwater and colder ambient surface environment; lower-density groundwater rises above cool surface waters and thus can be imaged by a UAS. The resulting TIR orthomosaic shows fine detail of seepage distribution and downstream influence along the several restored channel forms, which was an objective of the ecological restoration design. The restored stream channel has increased connectivity to peatland groundwater discharge, reducing the ecosystem thermal stressors. Such aerial techniques can be used to guide ecological restoration design and assess post-restoration outcomes, especially in settings where ecosystem structure and function is governed by groundwater and surface water interaction.« less

Authors:
; ORCiD logo; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1545408
Grant/Contract Number:  
SC0016412
Resource Type:
Published Article
Journal Name:
Water
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Water Journal Volume: 11 Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 2073-4441
Publisher:
MDPI AG
Country of Publication:
Switzerland
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Harvey, Mark C., Hare, Danielle K., Hackman, Alex, Davenport, Glorianna, Haynes, Adam B., Helton, Ashley, Lane, Jr., John W., and Briggs, Martin A. Evaluation of Stream and Wetland Restoration Using UAS-Based Thermal Infrared Mapping. Switzerland: N. p., 2019. Web. doi:10.3390/w11081568.
Harvey, Mark C., Hare, Danielle K., Hackman, Alex, Davenport, Glorianna, Haynes, Adam B., Helton, Ashley, Lane, Jr., John W., & Briggs, Martin A. Evaluation of Stream and Wetland Restoration Using UAS-Based Thermal Infrared Mapping. Switzerland. doi:10.3390/w11081568.
Harvey, Mark C., Hare, Danielle K., Hackman, Alex, Davenport, Glorianna, Haynes, Adam B., Helton, Ashley, Lane, Jr., John W., and Briggs, Martin A. Mon . "Evaluation of Stream and Wetland Restoration Using UAS-Based Thermal Infrared Mapping". Switzerland. doi:10.3390/w11081568.
@article{osti_1545408,
title = {Evaluation of Stream and Wetland Restoration Using UAS-Based Thermal Infrared Mapping},
author = {Harvey, Mark C. and Hare, Danielle K. and Hackman, Alex and Davenport, Glorianna and Haynes, Adam B. and Helton, Ashley and Lane, Jr., John W. and Briggs, Martin A.},
abstractNote = {Large-scale wetland restoration often focuses on repairing the hydrologic connections degraded by anthropogenic modifications. Of these hydrologic connections, groundwater discharge is an important target, as these surface water ecosystem control points are important for thermal stability, among other ecosystem services. However, evaluating the effectiveness of the restoration activities on establishing groundwater discharge connection is often difficult over large areas and inaccessible terrain. Unoccupied aircraft systems (UAS) are now routinely used for collecting aerial imagery and creating digital surface models (DSM). Lightweight thermal infrared (TIR) sensors provide another payload option for generation of sub-meter-resolution aerial TIR orthophotos. This technology allows for the rapid and safe survey of groundwater discharge areas. Aerial TIR water-surface data were collected in March 2019 at Tidmarsh Farms, a former commercial cranberry peatland located in coastal Massachusetts, USA (41°54′17″ N 70°34′17″ W), where stream and wetland restoration actions were completed in 2016. Here, we present a 0.4 km2 georeferenced, temperature-calibrated TIR orthophoto of the area. The image represents a mosaic of nearly 900 TIR images captured by UAS in a single morning with a total flight time of 36 min and is supported by a DSM derived from UAS-visible imagery. The survey was conducted in winter to maximize temperature contrast between relatively warm groundwater and colder ambient surface environment; lower-density groundwater rises above cool surface waters and thus can be imaged by a UAS. The resulting TIR orthomosaic shows fine detail of seepage distribution and downstream influence along the several restored channel forms, which was an objective of the ecological restoration design. The restored stream channel has increased connectivity to peatland groundwater discharge, reducing the ecosystem thermal stressors. Such aerial techniques can be used to guide ecological restoration design and assess post-restoration outcomes, especially in settings where ecosystem structure and function is governed by groundwater and surface water interaction.},
doi = {10.3390/w11081568},
journal = {Water},
number = 8,
volume = 11,
place = {Switzerland},
year = {2019},
month = {7}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record
DOI: 10.3390/w11081568

Save / Share:

Works referenced in this record:

Unmanned aerial vehicle-based monitoring of groundwater inputs to surface waters using an economical thermal infrared camera
journal, May 2018


Process-based Principles for Restoring River Ecosystems
journal, March 2010


Identifying spatial variability of groundwater discharge in a wetland stream using a distributed temperature sensor: GROUNDWATER DISCHARGE IN WETLAND STREAM
journal, October 2007

  • Lowry, Christopher S.; Walker, John F.; Hunt, Randall J.
  • Water Resources Research, Vol. 43, Issue 10
  • DOI: 10.1029/2007WR006145

Linking ecological theory with stream restoration
journal, April 2007


Evaluating ecosystem goods and services after restoration of marginal upland peatlands in South-West England
journal, February 2013

  • Grand-Clement, Emilie; Anderson, Karen; Smith, David
  • Journal of Applied Ecology, Vol. 50, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.12039

Assessing the potential of drone‐based thermal infrared imagery for quantifying river temperature heterogeneity
journal, February 2019

  • Dugdale, Stephen J.; Kelleher, Christa A.; Malcolm, Iain A.
  • Hydrological Processes, Vol. 33, Issue 7
  • DOI: 10.1002/hyp.13395

Explicit consideration of preferential groundwater discharges as surface water ecosystem control points
journal, June 2018

  • Briggs, Martin A.; Hare, Danielle K.
  • Hydrological Processes, Vol. 32, Issue 15
  • DOI: 10.1002/hyp.13178

Efficient hydrogeological characterization of remote stream corridors using drones
journal, December 2018

  • Briggs, Martin A.; Dawson, Cian B.; Holmquist-Johnson, Christopher L.
  • Hydrological Processes, Vol. 33, Issue 2
  • DOI: 10.1002/hyp.13332

Quantifying submerged fluvial topography using hyperspatial resolution UAS imagery and structure from motion photogrammetry: SUBMERGED FLUVIAL TOPOGRAPHY FROM UAS IMAGERY AND SfM
journal, August 2014

  • Woodget, A. S.; Carbonneau, P. E.; Visser, F.
  • Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, Vol. 40, Issue 1
  • DOI: 10.1002/esp.3613

Hydrogeological controls on spatial patterns of groundwater discharge in peatlands
journal, January 2017

  • Hare, Danielle K.; Boutt, David F.; Clement, William P.
  • Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, Vol. 21, Issue 12
  • DOI: 10.5194/hess-21-6031-2017

Drone with thermal infrared camera provides high resolution georeferenced imagery of the Waikite geothermal area, New Zealand
journal, October 2016


Airborne thermal infrared videography of stream temperature anomalies from a small unoccupied aerial system
journal, July 2018

  • Fitch, Kyle; Kelleher, Christa; Caldwell, Samuel
  • Hydrological Processes, Vol. 32, Issue 16
  • DOI: 10.1002/hyp.13218

Moving Beyond the Banks: Hyporheic Restoration Is Fundamental to Restoring Ecological Services and Functions of Streams
journal, March 2010

  • Hester, Erich T.; Gooseff, Michael N.
  • Environmental Science & Technology, Vol. 44, Issue 5
  • DOI: 10.1021/es902988n

A comparison of thermal infrared to fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for evaluation of groundwater discharge to surface water
journal, November 2015


Combining unmanned aerial vehicle-based remote sensing and stable water isotope analysis to monitor treatment peatlands of mining areas
journal, August 2019